How Technology is Affecting Students, Schools, and Education

This issue graphs student use of technology, the types of software and hardware selected by school districts, the educational value of technology and the staff positions primarily responsible for technology support in the schools.

1. Computer and Internet Use

44% of children use computers and 42% use the Internet for their assignments

Source: U. S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Computer and Internet Use by Children and Adolescents in 2001 (released October 2003)

Children 4 to 6 years of age:

who have ever used a computer 70%

who use a computer in a typical day 27%

who use a computer several times a week 39%

Children up to 6 years of age:

who have a computer in their bedroom 7%

Source: The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and the Children’s Digital Media Centers, Zero to Six: Electronic Media in the Lives of Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers (released October 2003)

2. Tech-Taught Teens?

A random survey of 1,000 adults shows that most teens are getting basic skills but not necessarily a number of practical 21st century technology skills. According to the adults surveyed:

Teens are learning basic skills: 75%

Teens are being taught to use technology effectively: 60%

Teens are learning communication skills: 48%

Teens are getting critical thinking and decision-making skills: 37%

Teens are learning how to make a difference in their community: 24%

Source: Partnership for 21st Century Skills (released June 2003)

3. Software

Administrative software implemented in 2002 (percentage of school districts surveyed; multiple answers permitted)

Computerized attendance records: 84.7%

Computerized report cards: 82.4%

Computerized assessment: 58.0%

Data warehousing of student records: 52.4%

Computerized standards-based curriculum management: 41.8%

Digital student portfolio: 27.3%

None of the above: 4.4%

Don’t know: 0.2 %

Source: Quality Education Data Inc.

4. Hardware (Windows PC and Mac)

Percent of districts with PCs or Macs, either desktop or notebook, in 2002

31% Mac (26.9% desktop and 4.1% notebook)

69% Windows PC (63.8% desktop and 5.2% notebook)

Nearly 64 percent of installed instructional computers in the K-12 market are desktop Windows PCs, and almost 27 percent are desktop Macs.

Source: Quality Education Data Inc.

5. Educational Value

(Based on a survey of parents)

Mostly helps | Mostly hurts | Not much effect | Other/NA

Using a computer: 72% | 5% | 12% | 11%

Watching television: 43% | 27% | 21% | 9%

Playing video games: 22% | 40% | 27% | 11%

Source: The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and the Children’s Digital Media Centers, Zero to Six: Electronic Media in the Lives of Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers (released October 2003)

6. Orgware

Staff positions that were primarily responsible for computer hardware, software and Internet support at schools in 2002

Full-time paid school technology director/coordinator: 38%

District staff: 26%

Teacher or other staff as part of formal responsibilities: 18%

Part-time paid school technology director/coordinator: 11%

Other (including outside contractor and teachers or staff as volunteers): 7%

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Internet Access in U. S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994-2002 (released October 2003)

Oct 12 2006

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