ISTE 2016: Introducing New Features from Google for Education

New functions and product releases from Google bring lessons to life in new ways, and make it easier for teachers to engage students.

Already a powerhouse in the educational technology landscape, Google for Education today announced that it is expanding its K–12 toolkit even further.

Schools and districts will now have access to two new learning-focused offerings: the Google Expeditions virtual reality (VR) app and the Chrome app for Google Cast for Education. They’ll also enjoy time-saving upgrades to the Quizzes function in Google Forms.

Check out details on each update below, and then head over to EdTech’s official ISTE 2016 coverage page for more breaking news from the event.

Students Explore Their World with Expeditions

Following the success of its Expeditions Pioneer Program, Google released its Expeditions app to all teachers. The move gives students across the globe the chance to embark on more than 200 VR fieldtrips via Google’s low-cost Cardboard headset.

Teachers need only download the app onto their Android devices to get started. In anticipation of the school year, districts can also preorder kits containing tablets, VR viewers and a router.

Connecting Wirelessly with Google Cast for Education

The free Chrome app Google Cast for Education simplifies screen sharing in both directions: Using the devices they already own, students can display their screens on the projector at the front of the room, and teachers can display their screens on each student’s device.

Because all video and audio sharing is wireless, teachers can immediately cut the cords that tie them to the front of the room, and begin interacting with students, even during presentations.

Improvements to Quizzes in Google Forms

Educators assessing their students through Google Forms will now have the ability to grade multiple choice and check-box answers automatically so they can spend more time teachers. The upgrade to Quizzes also lets teachers provide immediate feedback to students who answer a question incorrectly.

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Jun 27 2016