EdTech - Technology Solutions That Drive Education https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/rss.xml en FBI Issues Warning for K–12 Schools on Student Data Privacy https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/fbi-issues-warning-k-12-schools-student-data-privacy <span>FBI Issues Warning for K–12 Schools on Student Data Privacy</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/k12/user/9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Fri, 09/21/2018 - 16:57</span> <div><p>Schools utilizing education technology may need to <strong>double down on cybersecurity</strong> as collections of student data become more common targets for cybercriminals, announces the Federal Bureau of Investigations <a href="https://www.ic3.gov/media/2018/180913.aspx" target="_blank">in an alert</a>, Tuesday.</p> <p>According to the FBI, utilizing education technology offers a number of useful services, including “adaptive, personalized learning experiences, and unique opportunities for student collaboration,” as well help with administrative services. However, in exchange, education technology companies may have access to student information including <strong>biometrics, </strong><strong>personal</strong><strong> identifiable information and students’ geolocation</strong>. </p> <p>With two known cyber attacks on education technology companies in 2017, the FBI warns schools to take extra precaution to protect student data.</p> <p>“Malicious use of this sensitive data could result in social engineering, bullying, tracking, identity theft, or other means for targeting children,” according to the alert. “Therefore, the FBI is providing awareness to schools and parents of the important role cybersecurity plays in the securing of student information and devices.”</p> <p>In order to keep student data protected, the FBI recommends in the alert that schools and parents do the following:</p> <ul><li>Research existing student and child privacy protections of the <a href="https://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html" target="_blank">Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA</a>), the <a href="https://www2.ed.gov/policy//gen/guid/fpco/ppra/index.html" target="_blank">Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA)</a>, the <a href="https://www.ftc.gov/enforcement/rules/rulemaking-regulatory-reform-proceedings/childrens-online-privacy-protection-rule" target="_blank">Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA)</a>, and state laws as they apply to EdTech services.</li> <li>Discuss with their local districts about what and how <strong>EdTech technologies and programs</strong> are used in their schools.</li> <li>Conduct research on <strong>parent coalition and information-sharing organizations</strong> which are available online for those looking for support and additional resources.</li> <li><strong>Research school-related cyber breaches</strong> which can further inform families of student data vulnerabilities.</li> <li>Consider <strong>credit or identity theft monitoring</strong> to check for any fraudulent use of their children’s identity.</li> <li><strong>Conduct regular Internet searches</strong> of children’s information to help identify the exposure and spread of their information on the Internet.</li> </ul></div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"><img src="/k12/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/headshot.jpeg.jpg?itok=QfIQ8S6q" width="58" height="58" alt="Eli Zimmerman" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"> <div>Eli Zimmerman</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=eaztweets&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Eli has been eagerly pursuing a journalistic career since he left the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill School of Journalism. Previously, Eli was a staff reporter for medical trade publication <em>Frontline Medical News,</em> where he experienced the impact of continuous education and evolving teaching methods through the medical lens. When not in the office, Eli is busy scanning the web for the latest podcasts or stepping into the boxing ring for a few rounds.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 21 Sep 2018 20:57:48 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41351 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Mixed Reality Brings New Life to K–12 Classrooms https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/mixed-reality-brings-new-life-k-12-classrooms-perfcon <span>Mixed Reality Brings New Life to K–12 Classrooms</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/k12/user/9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Fri, 09/21/2018 - 08:53</span> <div><p>Among the emerging technologies hitting the K–12 sphere, virtual, augmented and <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=Virtual%20Reality&amp;ctlgfilter=&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">mixed reality tools</a> have <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/07/learning-comes-alive-virtual-reality-and-other-audiovisual-technologies">garnered a lot of interest</a>.</p> <p>Mixed reality <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/4-ways-k-12-can-maximize-impact-immersive-technology-classroom">has remarkable potential</a> for the K–12 classroom. Here is a tool that lets students explore the molten core of our planet or get deep in the anatomy of a frog without ever picking up a scalpel — all with the click of a button.</p> <p>Mixed reality is still relatively new, however, and while more research is coming out on its benefits, teachers want to make sure investing in virtual reality headsets will <strong>open new doors</strong> for their students and not just be another shiny toy collecting dust in the classroom.</p> <p>“I like to describe the space as embryonic. One of the interesting things I’ve seen in the K–12 space in particular as it relates to the technology is there is a lot of interest but also a lot of questions,” says Dan Ayoub, general manager of mixed reality education at <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/microsoft-interstitial.html?enkwrd=Microsoft" target="_blank">Microsoft</a>, in an interview. “The first questions have been around the research — ‘prove to me that this is going to <strong>improve the academic performance</strong> of our students’ — and that speaks to K–12 educators having a lot of experience and certainly not wanting to have just another flavor of the week.”</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/qa-vr-innovator-kris-hupp-best-ways-bring-tech-schools" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> Read this Q&amp;A with a VR expert on how to implement AR/VR in the classroom!</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Mixed Reality Offers More Than a Field Trip</h2> <p>One of the beacons of virtual reality use is placing students in situations they would <strong>never experience otherwise</strong>. This immersion can have a powerful effect on engagement, Ayoub says.</p> <p>“If you can actually put the students in an experience where they can do or see or interact with what they’ve just heard about [in class], that engagement understanding and retention goes way, way up,” Ayoub explains. “You can have them do things you could never have them do, like have them blowing up chemistry sets, [or] you can put them on the surface of the moon.”</p> <p>At <a href="https://schools.mnps.org/hunters-lane-high-school/" target="_blank">Hunters Lane High School</a> in Tennessee, some teachers have done just that.</p> <p>When Hunters Lane equipped a “virtual reality lab” with <a href="https://www.cdw.com/product/HTC-Vive-CPO-Education-Edition/4859493" target="_blank">HTC Vive gear</a>, creative writing teacher Caitlin Weaver used the tech to let students <strong>place themselves on the Titanic</strong> as it sank to the bottom of the ocean and feel the power of the Apollo 11 space mission as it launched into the atmosphere, all to inspire their writing.</p> <p>“With the Titanic, the kids did a lot of research on the boats first,” Weaver said in an <a href="https://www.amd.com/Documents/vr-in-the-classroom-case-study.pdf" target="_blank">AMD case study</a>. “They then used the VR to place themselves in the shoes of different historical figures. They had to pretend to be passengers on the ship or to be the person that eventually found the wreckage, etc.”</p> <p>Students studying information technology took advantage of the VR headsets to <strong>create computer programs</strong> and troubleshoot technology issues.</p> <p>Research shows VR is not just a gimmick, but instead it can change the way students’ brains function in the classroom, Jaime Donally, founder of <a href="https://www.arvrinedu.com/about" target="_blank">ARVRinEDU</a> and a mixed reality professional development consultant, tells <em>EdTech</em>.</p> <p>Donally’s personal experience speaks to the power of the device: After her 9-year-old began using AR to help with dyslexia, Donally found her daughter made significant improvements.</p> <p>“It took her a while, but <strong>it only took her once</strong>, and it was retained for the long term,” Donally says. “Her brain had to work extra hard to understand those letters, and she was physically getting up and moving, and I think there is something really powerful about that.” </p> <h2 id="toc_1">Put Content Creation in the Hands of Students</h2> <p>One shortcoming of virtual reality right now is the <strong>limited content available</strong> for classrooms, Ayoub says.</p> <p>“We still hear content get called out quite a bit,” Ayoub says. “We need to make sure there’s a lot of content, and I would say good-quality content.” </p> <p>While Ayoub says Microsoft is working with education giant<a href="https://www.pearson.com/us/" target="_blank"> Pearson</a> and other collaborators to create more VR content for the classroom, there is another source: <strong>students</strong>.</p> <p>With tools like Tinkercad and <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/Software/Business-Software/CAD-CAM-Software/?w=F27&amp;key=autocad&amp;ln=0&amp;b=AUT&amp;enkwrd=Autocad&amp;a1568=50079789" target="_blank">AutoCAD</a>, students can create 3D objects and construct virtual worlds, offering experience in computer science skills and using the VR technology to immerse themselves in their education.</p> <p>Encouraging students to be the masters of their own virtual experience allows them to explore VR’s limitless possibilities — and not doing so could be counterproductive, according to Donally.</p> <p>“If we’re teaching students about the skills and the knowledge we think they need to have, then we’re doing them an injustice,” Donally explains. “They need to be directing those steps as well, and they need to be guiding us and directing us on what is powerful and what is needed in education.”</p> <p>At <a href="http://www.mooreschools.com/mhs" target="_blank">Moore High School</a> in Oklahoma, AP computer science students used their creativity and computer science skills to <strong>create virtual reality worlds</strong> for special needs students.</p> <p>The idea was born after watching a video of an engineer create waterproof wheelchairs for disabled children to go to water parks, Victor Rook, computer science teacher at Moore High School, tells <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M87O3J2uD9I" target="_blank"><em>The Oklahoman</em></a>.</p> <p>“A bell kind of rang with us that we’re already taking all these journeys in the virtual reality space, and we can take our special needs kids on these journeys without getting wet,” Rook says. “It’s a great chance for the AP computer science kids to do some service learning.”</p> <p><em><strong>JOIN THE CONVERSATION:</strong> Tweet at <a data-user-name="EdTech_K12" href="https://twitter.com/EdTech_K12" rel="user" target="_blank">@EdTech_K12</a> and share your VR/AR experience! </em></p> <h2 id="toc_2">Have a Plan Before Going Virtual</h2> <p>While schools are finding success with VR implementation, attaining the outcomes teachers want means planning how to properly use the technology.</p> <p>“I see [VR] being used wrong so often,” Donally says. “Implementation for this is critical for success.”</p> <p>Similar to taking kids to a museum, if teachers <strong>do not explain the context </strong>of what you saw, then students will not take away the critical classroom goals teachers had in mind when setting up the trip, Donally explains. </p> <p>“We do that with virtual reality, or augmented reality, too often,” Donally says. “We make these assumptions that because they went somewhere or because they did something, that they are going to pick up all the skills we expected them to.”</p> <p>When working with teachers to construct an implementation plan, Donally encourages them to <strong>explore the specific needs</strong> of the school and the curriculum they have first, and then see how VR might improve their lessons.</p> <p>However, VR alone is not enough to make these changes, according to Donally, and teachers should remember to use the tool as a supplement, not a main feature of the classroom.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"><img src="/k12/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/headshot.jpeg.jpg?itok=QfIQ8S6q" width="58" height="58" alt="Eli Zimmerman" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"> <div>Eli Zimmerman</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=eaztweets&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Eli has been eagerly pursuing a journalistic career since he left the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill School of Journalism. Previously, Eli was a staff reporter for medical trade publication <em>Frontline Medical News,</em> where he experienced the impact of continuous education and evolving teaching methods through the medical lens. When not in the office, Eli is busy scanning the web for the latest podcasts or stepping into the boxing ring for a few rounds.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 21 Sep 2018 12:53:49 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41346 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 AI, Personalized Learning Are a Dynamic Duo for K–12 Classrooms https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/ai-personalized-learning-are-dynamic-duo-k-12-classrooms <span>AI, Personalized Learning Are a Dynamic Duo for K–12 Classrooms</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/k12/user/9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Thu, 09/20/2018 - 12:48</span> <div><p>During back to school season, so many things are new. New students. New teachers. New learning. New school or district wide initiatives, including new software. </p> <p>Yet, for all that’s new, there are certain things that don’t change. For the last decade, some of the most common initiatives have been about <strong>increasing personalization and using technology</strong>. </p> <p>However, educators need to tread carefully or run the risk of technology making teaching and learning less student-centered instead of more and failing to <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/08/k-12-schools-should-teach-soft-skills-prepare-students-future-workforce">prepare our students</a> to be successful adults. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/07/successful-11-device-programs-help-students-get-online-home"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> Check out how teachers are using the latest tech to improve one-to-one initiatives!</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">The Issue of One-to-one Learning in Large Classes</h2> <p>The impetus for personalization lies in increasing student achievement. <a href="https://www.mheducation.com/highered/ideas-new/use-of-adaptive-learning-solve-2-sigma-problem.html" target="_blank">Research</a> conducted in the mid-80’s by Benjamin Bloom, of <a href="http://web.mit.edu/5.95/readings/bloom-two-sigma.pdf" target="_blank">Bloom’s Taxonomy fame</a>, found that the most effective model of instruction is one student to one teacher. </p> <p>It almost necessarily customizes the teaching to the learner. Most students are able to achieve at much higher levels with <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/experts-weigh-key-considerations-k-12-11-programs">1:1 teaching</a>, but, of course, the logistics are impractical. The mission of educators then becomes figuring out how to provide 1:1-level results with <strong>group instruction</strong>--the problem of scale.</p> <p>Fortunately, as problems go, scale is something we humans have experience solving. When we have to achieve more with fewer resources, we invent a tool. Want to move more goods but they’re really heavy? </p> <p>Invent the wheel. Need to disseminate information to a broader audience but everyone is far away? Here comes the newspaper. Want to elicit <strong>higher student achievement </strong>but you only have one teacher for 40 students? Thank you, <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/06/teachers-are-turning-ai-solutions-assistance">adaptive software</a>. </p> <h2 id="toc_1">Adaptive Software Refines Personalized Learning</h2> <p>“Adaptive” in edtech is, at its core, a way for schools to provide the right learning experience for each individual student at exactly the right time. Currently, the <strong>primary ways adaptive software adapt</strong> are with content, <a href="https://blog.cdw.com/cloud-computing/ibm-watson-makes-data-analytics-elementary" target="_blank">assessment</a>, and sequence. </p> <p>Imagine <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/brands/azure/default.aspx?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIwrGo_oXK3QIViODICh0aUQwDEAAYASAAEgKoI_D_BwE&amp;cm_ven=acquirgy&amp;cm_cat=google&amp;cm_pla=Microsoft&amp;cm_ite=Microsoft+Azure+B&amp;s_kwcid=AL!4223!3!145716974760!b!!g!!+azure&amp;ef_id=Wwb74wAABqf8KhGW:20180920165422:s" target="_blank">a program</a> that delivers a pre-test or pinpoints a skill gap, then serves up learning content. While the student consumes content, the software is probing for understanding and remediating in real time. Products with a legitimate claim to the “adaptive” label have one or more of those functions.</p> <p>Truely adaptive software can <strong>assess, deliver content, and modify</strong> a student’s path through curriculum according to a set of programmed instructional heuristics. Seems ideal, right? </p> <p>Every student can be on his or her own path and moving at their own pace. If teachers are relieved of the need to manage instruction and assessment, they could manage the individual learning paths of 30, 50, or even 100 students. <strong>1:1 at scale</strong>. However, education involves more than just individualized content and assessment.</p> <h2 id="toc_2">AI Tools and Personalized Learning Are a Powerful Pair</h2> <p>There is no argument that the world has changed in the last 10 years. According to a Bureau of Labor Statistics report in 2012, most job growth <strong>between 2008 and 2018</strong> would be in the areas of hospitality and tourism (16 percent); business, management and administration (13 percent); health science (10 percent); marketing, sales and service (9 percent); transportation, distribution and logistics (9 percent); and manufacturing (8 percent).</p> <p>What careers will be in demand in the future and what should we be teaching our students? The necessary skills of the future are much more about human interaction. We’ll need more people to make software, solve problems creatively, and interact well with other humans. </p> <p>This is where adaptive software and AI fall short. What happens when<strong> interacting with a good teacher</strong> is much richer. So many of the activities we reflexively engage in as teachers aren’t possible to program into software. </p> <p>How do we encourage a sense of community, model a love of learning, show compassion, teach metacognitive and critical thinking skills, instill respect for others, or foster passion? That kind of <strong>experience, intuition, and good teacher judgment</strong> can only happen when we have a personal relationship with our students — the kind of relationship that necessarily develops when a passionate teacher is able to truly personalize learning for each student. </p> <p>It’s critical to carefully examine your expectations for new software and ensure you select products that flexibly support personalization and the all-important factor of human interaction.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/taxonomy/term/11501"> <div>Hilary Scharton</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=@HilaryScharton&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="background:white"><span style="line-height:115%"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:#212121">Hilary Scharton is the Vice President of K-12 Product Strategy for </span></span></span></span></span><u><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="background:white"><span style="line-height:115%"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:#1e73be"><a href="https://www.canvaslms.com/gauge/"><span style="color:#1e73be">Canvas by Instructure</span></a></span></span></span></span></span></u><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="background:white"><span style="line-height:115%"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:#212121">, the open online learning management system (LMS) that makes teaching and learning easier</span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 20 Sep 2018 16:48:19 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41341 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 K–12 Schools Work to Incorporate Computer Science into Curriculums https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/k-12-schools-work-incorporate-computer-science-curriculums <span>K–12 Schools Work to Incorporate Computer Science into Curriculums</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/k12/user/9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Wed, 09/19/2018 - 12:15</span> <div><p>Forecasts report that <strong>computer science skills will be essential</strong> for the future workforce, creating a need for K–12 experts to work harder to incorporate such lessons into the curriculum. </p> <p>According to the <a href="https://actonline.org/wp-content/uploads/App_Economy_Report_2017_Digital.pdf" target="_blank">App Association</a>, there will be approximately <strong>1 million</strong> unfilled computing jobs in <strong>2024</strong>. Research conducted by the <a href="https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/blog/2013/12/11/computer-science-everyone" target="_blank">Bureau of Labor Statistics</a> has found that number could be reached by <strong>2020</strong>. These findings have put a fire underneath educators and K–12 organizations to refocus efforts to teach computer science skills.</p> <p>“We don’t just need computer science graduates to fill computing jobs; we need people with technical abilities to fill <strong>jobs in almost every industry</strong>,” Victoria Espinel, president of Software.org: the BSA Foundation and chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on the Digital Economy and Society, <a href="https://techpost.bsa.org/2018/05/21/its-time-to-prepare-the-workforce-of-the-future/" target="_blank">writes in a blog post</a>. “Those jobs will be created by advancements in software, and kids need to prepare now for those possibilities. They won’t all need computer science degrees, but basic digital literacy will be essential.”</p> <p>To facilitate increased focus from educators, the International Society for Technology in Education <a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zdD0SJ7zIFZ4W09u4YYVJKonaPR3tohvWIN8BOSsmEY/edit?ts=5b2011fe" target="_blank">updated its standards </a>for computer science curricula in July of this year, the first time since 2012, <a href="https://edscoop.com/computer-science-standards-iste-code-org" target="_blank">EdScoop reports</a>. The new guidelines encourage teachers to move <strong>beyond a lecture-style pedagogy</strong> to teach computer science, and instead find creative ways to show students how computational thinking can be used in vastly different ways across a wide spectrum of topics.</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2017/12/microsoft-connects-k-12-classrooms-computer-science-professionals"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> Read how Microsoft is pairing K–12 classrooms with computer science experts!</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Engage Students in Data Science Through Activities</h2> <p>When asked to imagine what data analysis in schools might look like, many might picture a classroom full of students huddled around computer screens, inputting numbers into spreadsheets and running simulations until their eyes water. </p> <p>However, computational thinking does not have to be confined to a classroom. By using <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/Computers/Notebook-Computers/?w=C3&amp;pCurrent=1&amp;key=chromebooks&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1&amp;ln=0&amp;enkwrd=chromebook" target="_blank">personal devices</a> and data science programs like <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?b=TLU&amp;enkwrd=Tableau" target="_blank">Tableau</a>, teachers can come up with new ways to <strong>incorporate data science</strong> to teach kids STEM skills while still having fun. </p> <p>At<a href="https://excelps.org/" target="_blank"> Excel Public Charter School</a> in Kent, Wash., students are <strong>using sabermetrics</strong> to analyze one another’s athletic skills in physical education class to determine their best uses on the kickball field, <a href="https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-07-25-how-data-science-adds-computational-thinking-and-fun-to-gym-class" target="_blank">EdSurge reports</a>. </p> <p>Excel’s Eric Murphy, the teacher that came up with the idea, gave each student a chance to be a “data captain,” capturing students’ play statistics to create athlete profiles. Students could keep track of their improvement over time and use player profiles to strategize optimal fielding techniques when particular students came up to bat. </p> <p>Incorporating data science into physical education classes created an opportunity to include both athletic and nonathletic students, according to Murphy, while simultaneously teaching students computational thinking skills that resonate beyond the kickball field.</p> <h2 id="toc_1">Encourage Autonomy Through Smart Lab Projects</h2> <p>Other K–12 schools have found success by allowing students to pick topics they are interested in, then finding ways for them to <strong>inject computer science</strong> into those areas.</p> <p>K–12 schools are creating “SmartLabs,” incorporating <a href="https://blog.cdw.com/digital-workspace/classroom-modernization-1-2-3" target="_blank">modern learning environment technologies</a> like <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/iste-2018-take-tour-modern-learning-environment">flexible </a><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/iste-2018-take-tour-modern-learning-environment">work stations</a> to encourage collaboration, and <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/Monitors-Projectors/Interactive-Whiteboards-Accessories/Interactive-Whiteboards/?w=D02&amp;enkwrd=smartboard" target="_blank">interactive </a><a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/Monitors-Projectors/Interactive-Whiteboards-Accessories/Interactive-Whiteboards/?w=D02&amp;enkwrd=smartboard" target="_blank">smartboards</a> for students to present their findings. </p> <p>At Lucerne Valley Elementary School, students are able to <strong>pursue their own projects</strong> in a special SmartLab classroom, <em>Victor Valley News </em>reports. Through the program, students can pursue projects ranging from data analytics to digital communications. </p> <p>In line with ISTE’s new standards, students work under the guidance of a teacher to team up to explore their chosen topics using data science and coding, forgoing tests for <strong>electronic portfolios</strong> documenting their progress. </p> <p>“The SmartLab is a state-of-the-art classroom called a STEM center,” Burt Umstead, the school’s principal, told <em>Victor Valley News</em>. “In addition to working with leading edge technology, students develop critical skills such as problem-solving, collaboration, project management and communications.”</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"><img src="/k12/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/headshot.jpeg.jpg?itok=QfIQ8S6q" width="58" height="58" alt="Eli Zimmerman" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"> <div>Eli Zimmerman</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=eaztweets&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Eli has been eagerly pursuing a journalistic career since he left the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill School of Journalism. Previously, Eli was a staff reporter for medical trade publication <em>Frontline Medical News,</em> where he experienced the impact of continuous education and evolving teaching methods through the medical lens. When not in the office, Eli is busy scanning the web for the latest podcasts or stepping into the boxing ring for a few rounds.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 19 Sep 2018 16:15:42 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41331 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 4 Steps to Create a Strong 3D Printing Program https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/4-steps-create-strong-3d-printing-program <span>4 Steps to Create a Strong 3D Printing Program </span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/k12/user/9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Mon, 09/17/2018 - 12:19</span> <div><p>In educational technology, it can be difficult to <strong>discern a fad from a future classroom staple</strong>. When I first learned of <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/Printers-Scanners-Print-Supplies/3D-Printers-Accessories/3D-Printers/?w=PI1&amp;enkwrd=3d+Printers" target="_blank">3D printing</a> in the classroom, I wondered if it held merit. The more I learned about it, the more I realized the untapped potential of this technology.</p> <p>3D printing is prevalent in a wide range of fields, including medicine, fashion, construction, manufacturing, aeronautics, culinary arts and many more. <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/04/3-Tips-for-3D-Printing-Success">Bringing 3D printing technology</a> to the classroom creates opportunities for students that are <strong>limited only by their imagination</strong>. </p> <p>Young students gain a real-world learning experience with geometry and measurement, and develop spatial awareness through the use of computer-aided design (CAD) software. Older students can use 3D printing for applied physics and design.</p> <p>The implementation of a 3D printing program can be broad or narrow, depending on the curriculum. Here are four ways to create a successful 3D printing program:</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/cosn-2017-prosthetic-kids-hand-challenge"><strong>VIDEO:</strong> <em>See how students used 3D printing to create prosthetics for other kids!</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">1. Create a Unique Vision Using Education Standards</h2> <p>Every successful program should start with a vision and be aligned to standards, such as the <a href="https://www.iste.org/standards/for-students" target="_blank">ISTE Standards for Students</a>, specifically the standard for <strong>Innovative Designer and Computational Thinker</strong>. Additionally, ISTE addresses Common Core math standards in geometry and measurement across K–12 .</p> <p>Once you have a vision, every action flows from that ideology. My vision was to <strong>increase access and equity</strong> in a science, technology, engineering, the arts and mathematics (STEAM) curriculum for elementary students.</p> <p>After establishing your vision, write a goal of how you plan to achieve that vision. Having the steps outlined clearly will not only garner administrative support, but also give direction to the teachers who are implementing the program.</p> <h2 id="toc_1">2. Build a Team of Teachers Enthusiastic About Tech</h2> <p><strong>Teachers are the key to success</strong> with a 3D printing program, so they need <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/5-key-areas-technology-professional-development-teachers">training and support</a> along the way. In my district, I started with a cohort of teachers who were willing to learn and serve as lead teachers at their schools.</p> <p>We began with an initial training on the basics of 3D printing, followed by some lesson ideas. This was a lot of hands-on learning for them. Most of the participants had heard of 3D printing but had never used it. Following the training, teachers were provided support as needed with <strong>troubleshooting, model lessons </strong><strong>and</strong><strong> coaching</strong>.</p> <p>A few months after the initial training, the cohort met again to further develop curriculum and share best practices. At the second training, the teachers learned more advanced techniques for 3D printing. Whether you follow a model like this or design your own, a growth mindset, willingness to learn and a sense of adventure are key among participants.</p> <h2 id="toc_2">3. Start with Small 3D Printing Programs and Build Momentum </h2> <p>When implementing any new and innovative program, it’s best to <strong>start small and give it room to grow</strong>. In a focused group, you can work through issues that arise with minimal impact. This also allows for flexibility and adjustments along the way.</p> <p>When the program starts to grow, it can move forward with the strength of experience behind it. <strong>Document progress</strong> through photos, videos and testimonials of students, teachers and parents. Publicize the projects the students create in district and school newsletters, on the school website and in social media. Create excitement for the project and it will grow in size and scope.</p> <p>One way you can do this is to put the 3D printer in a public place — don’t hide it away in a workroom. Encourage curiosity by allowing students, teachers and parents to ask questions. As your program becomes established, don’t forget your initial adopters. Continue to support them, and you’ll find that a few teachers can make a big difference.</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2017/09/first-makerbot-k-12-innovation-center-teaches-students-steam-skills"><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> An innovation center in Arizona uses 3D Printers to teach STEM! </a></p> <h2 id="toc_3">4. Develop a Project Management System for 3D Printing</h2> <p>Once <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/02/tcea-2018-how-incorporate-3d-printing-any-lesson-plan">projects are being designed</a> and filament is melting into rockets, keychains and snowflakes, you will need a system to manage student designs that are waiting to be printed. For a single classroom teacher who manages the prints of his or her own students, <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/google-interstitial.html" target="_blank">Google</a> Classroom is a great solution.</p> <p>Ask students to get a shareable link of their design from Tinkercad or another CAD program and paste the link into an assignment posted by the teacher in <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/08/google-classroom-updates-k-12-teachers-should-know">Google Classroom</a>. To manage multiple classes, I created a Google Form that asks for a student’s name, teacher, project, color choice and link. This goes into a spreadsheet that is easily organized for managing printing.</p> <p>There are other <strong>cloud-based solutions</strong> that may work for your 3D printer. Depending on the printer type and its location, you may be able to print during the school day. Most likely, you will have to print after school and overnight. I usually have a one-week turnaround for student projects, especially if I am working with a whole class.</p> <p>If you’re ready to get started with 3D printing, you will find a growing professional learning network on social media platforms. If you don’t have an expert in your area, find one or become one. Happy printing!</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/taxonomy/term/11496"><img src="/k12/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/rebecca_buckhoff_moreno_valley.jpg.JPG.jpg?itok=vXO1q03O" width="58" height="58" alt="Rebecca Buckhoff" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/taxonomy/term/11496"> <div>Rebecca Buckhoff</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Technology professional development specialist at Moreno Valley Unified School District in southern California. She has led a movement in her district to increase access and equity in STEAM by developing and implementing a program for 3D printing in elementary schools.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 17 Sep 2018 16:19:27 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41326 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 5 Key Areas of Technology Professional Development for Teachers https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/5-key-areas-technology-professional-development-teachers <span>5 Key Areas of Technology Professional Development for Teachers</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/k12/user/9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Fri, 09/14/2018 - 10:07</span> <div><p>To assist the <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/07/bake-professional-development-your-education-pizza">professional development</a> process for both teachers and IT professionals, Digital Promise, in conjunction with <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/google.html?enkwrd=Google" target="_blank">Google</a>, has established a new program called the <a href="https://edu.google.com/giving/dynamic-learning-project/?modal_active=none" target="_blank">Dynamic Learning Project</a> to <strong>help introduce new education technology</strong> into the classroom. </p> <p>K–12 teachers are interested in adopting technology, but <strong>low confidence in their abilities</strong> to use it well enough to make the integration worth the investment is a significant barrier. </p> <p>Of 2,000 K–12 teachers surveyed, only <strong>10 percent</strong> reported feeling secure in their abilities to incorporate “higher-level” technology into their classroom. However, <strong>79 percent</strong> displayed a desire to go through training regimens to familiarize themselves with these new tools, according to <a href="https://www.pwc.com/us/en/about-us/corporate-responsibility/assets/pwc-are-we-preparing-our-kids-for-the-jobs-of-tomorrow.pdf" target="_blank">a PwC report</a>. </p> <p>While educators may present interest in professional development, it can be hard for administrators and IT teams to train educators, especially if they are <strong>not familiar with technology coaching methods</strong> themselves. </p> <p>In response, DLP designed a curriculum for teachers to interact and experiment with new educational tools, and paired teachers with l<strong>ocal technology coaches</strong> to perfect their training techniques. </p> <p>In <a href="http://digitalpromise.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/DLP_CoachingReport_2018.pdf" target="_blank">a report of its pilot year</a>, DLP found the tactics it used had positive results. Schools participating in DLP’s program found <strong>86 percent</strong> of teachers used technology more during the course of the year, compared to <strong>76 percent</strong> of those not in the program. Similarly, <strong>60 percent </strong>of DLP teachers reported seeing a significant increase in their ability to interact with education technology, compared to <strong>46 percent</strong> of other teachers.</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/experts-weigh-key-considerations-k-12-11-programs"><b>READ: </b><em>What K–12 schools should keep in mind when implementing a one-to-one device program!</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">5 Key Points of Professional Development</h2> <p>DLP uses five key points to guide teachers and coaches through the professional-development curriculum:</p> <ol><li><strong>Content Focus:</strong> When providing technology coaching, concrete examples are key. Instead of explaining the hypothetical uses of a virtual reality helmet, show teachers how <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/4-ways-k-12-can-maximize-impact-immersive-technology-classroom">using mixed reality gear</a> can be a helpful tool specific to their class material. For a history teacher, explain how a <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=Virtual%20reality&amp;ctlgfilter=&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">VR helmet</a> can teach students about past civilizations through a virtual exploration of ancient Rome. <br />  </li> <li><strong>Active Learning:</strong> Similar to the success teachers have found with students through new pedagogical practices, allowing teachers to actively engage in their own learning can help them retain lessons on using technology to solve classroom challenges. In the DLP program, coaches would ask teachers to choose from a list of challenges that commonly occur with students and then brainstorm how technological solutions could help. In one teacher’s case, introducing <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/Computers/Notebook-Computers/?w=C3&amp;pCurrent=1&amp;key=chromebooks&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1&amp;ln=0&amp;enkwrd=Chromebook" target="_blank">Chromebooks</a> into her class helped her simultaneously manage what was once an unruly classroom and improve student engagement.<br />  </li> <li><strong>Sustained Duration:</strong> The idea behind this one is relatively simple: Training takes time. K–12 administrators cannot be shown a tool once and expected to become experts overnight. If coaches are not available, companies like <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/microsoft-interstitial.html?enkwrd=microsoft" target="_blank">Microsoft</a> and <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/08/google-classroom-updates-k-12-teachers-should-know">Google offer resources</a> to help with navigating broad classroom technology practices, as well as specifics about products like <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/office365.html?enkwrd=office%20365" target="_blank">Office 365</a> or Google Classroom.<br />  </li> <li><strong>Collective Participation:</strong> Along with learning from trained technology coaches, some of the best sources for educators <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/teacher-training-first-step-edtech-integration-k-12-classrooms">are other educators</a>. For DLP participants, teachers involved in technology integration worked with each other to share ideas for ways to use their new tools to engage students. “Our eighth grade team is our most reluctant team, and two members [who attended the PD on digital badging] took it back to their team at the end of the day and they’ve now implemented digital badges for vocabulary, which is a campuswide focus,” said one DLP coach. “Now the entire eighth grade is doing vocabulary in their homeroom with digital badges, from a 25-minute presentation.” <br />  </li> <li><strong>Coherence:</strong> While all four of the previous points are important, the most crucial component is guiding these principles around school-specific goals for outcome improvement. <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/iste-2018-california-district-pursues-data-driven-decision-making">Utilizing data analytic</a>s can be a helpful way to understand where technology can best be injected into a school curriculum.</li> </ol></div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"><img src="/k12/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/headshot.jpeg.jpg?itok=QfIQ8S6q" width="58" height="58" alt="Eli Zimmerman" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"> <div>Eli Zimmerman</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=eaztweets&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Eli has been eagerly pursuing a journalistic career since he left the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill School of Journalism. Previously, Eli was a staff reporter for medical trade publication <em>Frontline Medical News,</em> where he experienced the impact of continuous education and evolving teaching methods through the medical lens. When not in the office, Eli is busy scanning the web for the latest podcasts or stepping into the boxing ring for a few rounds.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 14 Sep 2018 14:07:05 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41321 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 4 Ways K–12 Can Maximize the Impact of Immersive Technology in the Classroom https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/4-ways-k-12-can-maximize-impact-immersive-technology-classroom <span>4 Ways K–12 Can Maximize the Impact of Immersive Technology in the Classroom</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/k12/user/9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Thu, 09/13/2018 - 08:51</span> <div><p>Immersive technologies such as <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=VR&amp;ctlgfilter=&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">virtual reality</a> and 3D scanning are becoming so hot that educators across the country <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/qa-vr-innovator-kris-hupp-best-ways-bring-tech-schools">are beginning to roll them out</a> for students of all ages.</p> <p>The problem is that, while technologies blending elements of the physical and digital worlds in simulated environments offer <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/07/4-ways-make-virtual-reality-integration-pay">enormous academic value</a>, too many institutions fall prey to what I call the <strong>“buy it and forget it” approach</strong>.” This is a syndrome where principals, superintendents and others with purchasing power in educational institutions become so enamored with the novelty of new technology they decide they just need to have it — even if they <strong>do not completely understand why</strong>.</p> <p>In our personal lives, we are all prone to this behavior. A few years ago, for example, I recall seeing many people getting excited about the glitzy <a href="https://www.cdw.com/product/Sony-FWD-100Z9D-BRAVIA-Z9D-Series-100-Class-99.5-viewable-3D-LED-disp/5011893" target="_blank">3D television sets</a> on store shelves in Costco. They dropped thousands of dollars, loaded them onto carts and proudly wheeled them out the door to their eagerly awaiting families. </p> <p>Only later did many of these customers realize they would need better 3D headsets to have <strong>a passable viewing experience</strong>, and there was not much 3D programming on the air to justify the money they spent.</p> <p>Education technology purchasing is similar. Schools and universities have an unfortunate track record of laying out billions of dollars on bleeding-edge technologies that <strong>never quite take off</strong> and, as a result, never get used for any truly meaningful academic purposes.</p> <p>As education professionals, we cannot afford these types of wasteful mistakes with immersive technology because there is just too much at stake — too much opportunity to <strong>enhance, enrich and accelerate learning </strong>in unprecedented ways. For immersive technology to get there, it is vital to have a strategic plan that identifies why it is being considered, whom it will benefit and what metrics will be applied to demonstrate success. </p> <p>Your plan should ultimately address how much students will <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/07/learning-comes-alive-virtual-reality-and-other-audiovisual-technologies">learn because of this technology</a>, rather than in spite of it. Once an organization has a plan, knows roughly which technologies it needs and how they will be applied, then it is time to consider how to deploy them most effectively. Here are three tips to help:</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/iste-2017-vr-consumers-vr-creators"><b>WATCH: </b><em>See how students are using VR tools to create their own virtual content!</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">1. Prioritize Great Digital Content to Strengthen Impact</h2> <p>As with 3D TVs, a key to using immersive technology effectively is <strong>having plenty of content</strong> for it. But publishers are typically a few years behind the adoption curve, and most have been focused on creating immersive experiences that mirror what younger generations experience in their personal lives, meaning they are more about entertainment and games than true education.</p> <p>Publishers will eventually improve their offerings, but schools do not have to wait. The beauty of immersive technology is that it enables teachers and students to <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2017/10/how-will-ar-transform-education-infographic">collaboratively create their own digital learning</a> scenarios.</p> <p>For instance, suppose a biology teacher has a physical model of a human heart that he or she can separate into pieces. With existing technology, this teacher can scan each of those pieces into a computer and <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/05/holographic-tech-could-be-next-big-ar-offering-k-12-classrooms">share the digital objects</a> with students who can then handle and even 3D-print them.</p> <p>Suddenly, you are not only teaching students about organs; you are creating a <strong>lasting, digital learning exercise</strong> that can be shared in future projects. Students will have constant access to freshly created, fully interactive and remarkably compelling school projects that can be shared, discussed and worked on with hundreds of other students through global digital communities. </p> <h2 id="toc_1">2. Accentuate STEAM Learning Through VR/AR Integration</h2> <p>As I’ve previously noted, technology is the <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2017/08/history-stem-vs-steam-education-and-rise-stream">great enabler for STEAM learning</a> (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics). It inspires the imagination, enabling students to <strong>conceptualize difficult subjects</strong> in new ways. For instance, <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/hp-inc-interstitial.html?enkwrd=HP" target="_blank">HP</a>’s all-in-one immersive learning station called “<a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=sprout%20pro%20by&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">Sprout Pro</a>” is helping to transform students from passive observers to engaged learners with immersive technology that augments hands-on experiences across disciplines.</p> <p>It includes both a 2D and 3D scanner, as well as a <strong>projector, cameras and a touch mat with </strong><strong>stylus</strong> for scanning and customizing objects. Indeed, institutions are using Sprout with the specific goal of trying to get students – especially girls – more interested in STEAM-related careers. </p> <h2 id="toc_2">3. Use Immersive Tech to Tell Stories More Simply</h2> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2017/09/3-ways-use-g-suite-education-teach-storytelling">Storytelling</a> is one of the oldest and most effective learning tools we have ever known. If you make it part of immersive technology, you can amplify educational opportunities in incredible ways.</p> <p>Not so long ago, I remember hearing how young students were beginning to do class presentations using <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=microsoft&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">Microsoft</a> PowerPoint. While many of us might be exhausted by slide presentations now, at the time of their inception, the technology <strong>felt pretty novel</strong>.</p> <p>Today, we have a powerful opportunity to put <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/01/students-adopt-software-create-digital-stories">immersive technology to work</a> as a tool for telling compelling and memorable learning-based stories in the classroom. Imagine, for example, a history teacher trying to describe what life was like in ancient Rome. </p> <p>Rather than simply projecting a few photographs shot decades ago of the ancient ruins of Pompeii, it would be just as possible to illustrate how families lived with <strong>a virtual tour</strong>, walking students through the ruins of a home, progressing down the cobblestone street to the site of a market, stable, doctor’s office or spa. </p> <h2 id="toc_3">4. Do Not Forget to Invest in Professional Development</h2> <p>One of the most important things I can tell you about deploying immersive technology in schools is that you shouldn’t do it alone. There is too much room for error.</p> <p>As a rule of thumb, plan on spending <strong>$1 on professional development</strong> for every <strong>$1 budgeted on technology</strong>. This is a very new field, and you should not leave adoption to chance. Bring on experts. Maximize the odds your deployment will be successful by tapping the experience of others. </p> <p>In the long run, all these tips should <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/03/virtual-classrooms-and-vr-help-schools-get-qualified-teachers">help educators apply immersive technology</a> in ways that will stimulate students to be more engaged and truly shine. It all starts with a strategic plan. If done right, the only limit to success will your imagination. </p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/author/elliott-levine"><img src="/k12/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/Elliot%20Levine.jpeg.jpg?itok=T5wM__Zm" width="58" height="58" alt="Elliot Levine" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/author/elliott-levine"> <div>Elliott Levine</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=@edtech_elliott&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Elliott Levine is Director of Education for the Americas Region of HP, Inc. and the company’s first Distinguished Technologist focused solely on edtech. A former K-12 district administrator and professor, Elliott is a past columnist for Electronic School and American School Boards Journal.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 13 Sep 2018 12:51:06 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41316 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Mindful Tracking Cookie Policies Improve K—12 Data Security https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/mindful-tracking-cookie-policies-improve-k-12-data-security <span>Mindful Tracking Cookie Policies Improve K—12 Data Security</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/k12/user/9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Wed, 09/12/2018 - 12:18</span> <div><p>Current web browsing policies in K–12 schools may be allowing third parties to <strong>collect and sell student data</strong>, creating a need for schools to update and maintain safe internet use protocols.</p> <p>From unencrypted browsing during a class activity to embedding videos into presentations, schools can inadvertently <strong>compromise student privacy</strong> by exposing them to tracking cookies, according to a recently issued report from the Consortium of School Networking.</p> <p>There have been <strong>361 cybersecurity incidents</strong> involving public schools since 2016 according to the <a href="https://k12cybersecure.com/map/" target="_blank">K–12 Cybersecurity Resource Center</a>, and with <a href="https://www.kennasecurity.com/k-12-schools-facing-new-cybersecurity-threats-data-breaches/" target="_blank">rates increasing year over year</a>, schools need to be more aware of issues with data privacy and enact targeted solutions to keep student data safe.</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/iste-2017-best-practices-protect-students-data-privacy" target="_blank">Find more best practices for maintaining student data privacy!</a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Tracking Cookies Create Profiles Through Browsing History</h2> <p>While teachers and parents can help control what content students can access, many sites have an invisible threat that may compromise student privacy: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHeZ9HpOvO4&amp;index=2&amp;list=PLXC2w_psz2NRL21n7ilmG4-9YAZ3uToAR" target="_blank">tracking cookies</a>.</p> <p>Cookies can be used to make web browsing more streamlined. But they are able to <strong>collect student information</strong>, including location information, building profiles that can be used for targeted advertising and marketing purposes. </p> <p>“We talk about this in terms of URLs and tracking, but what we are tracking is bits and pieces of people’s lives being sent off into black boxes to be used in ways that we don’t know,” Bill Fitzgerald, a blogger who discovered tracking cookies hidden in an education product from Edmodo, told <a href="https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-05-15-edmodo-s-tracking-of-students-and-teachers-revives-skepticism-surrounding-free-edtech-tools" target="_blank">EdSurge</a>. “Next time you are picking your kids up from school, or if you pass a playground, think of each of those kids and the bits and pieces of their lives that are getting pushed out over the internet.”</p> <p>With students spending an<a href="https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=46" target="_blank"> increasing amount of time on the internet</a>, it is important that schools do their best to prevent students from <strong>unwittingly giving away this information</strong>.</p> <h2 id="toc_1">Best Practices to Keep Student Tracking to a Minimum</h2> <p>Some companies are already offering clear pathways to help cut down on tracking cookies so schools can feel more confident in maintaining their students’ privacy while still encouraging the use of <strong>online resources and devices in classrooms</strong>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft-interstitial.html?enkwrd=Microsoft" target="_blank">Microsoft </a>has <a href="https://blogs.windows.com/msedgedev/2018/05/17/samesite-cookies-microsoft-edge-internet-explorer/" target="_blank">instructions on their website for cookie management </a>that can be useful for classrooms that either allow students to bring in <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=microsoft%20surface%20pro&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">personal devices</a> or use the company’s tablets as part of a one-to-one device program. For <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/solutions/mobility/chromebooks.html" target="_blank">Chromebook</a> users, <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/google-interstitial.html" target="_blank">Google</a> <a href="https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/95647?co=GENIE.Platform%3DDesktop&amp;hl=en-GB" target="_blank">has similar information</a> available.</p> <p>School websites are also points of vulnerability, with a large percentage riddled with tracking cookies, according to a study by <a href="https://www.edtechstrategies.com/tracking-edu/introduction/" target="_blank">EdTech Strategies</a>. </p> <p>When creating school websites, schools should make sure to use <a href="https://developers.google.com/web/fundamentals/security/encrypt-in-transit/why-https" target="_blank">HTTPS encryption</a> to ensure “critical security and data integrity for both your websites and your users' personal information,” writes Kayce Basques, technical writer for Google.</p> <p>Finally, talk with students to help them understand best practices on sites that have a high number of tracking cookies. Social media platforms, for example, will usually deploy cookies when students click a “like” or “post” button. Training students to be more aware of the information they are revealing while using these websites may help them <strong>avoid giving up unnecessary data</strong>.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"><img src="/k12/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/headshot.jpeg.jpg?itok=QfIQ8S6q" width="58" height="58" alt="Eli Zimmerman" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"> <div>Eli Zimmerman</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=eaztweets&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Eli has been eagerly pursuing a journalistic career since he left the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill School of Journalism. Previously, Eli was a staff reporter for medical trade publication <em>Frontline Medical News,</em> where he experienced the impact of continuous education and evolving teaching methods through the medical lens. When not in the office, Eli is busy scanning the web for the latest podcasts or stepping into the boxing ring for a few rounds.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 12 Sep 2018 16:18:37 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41311 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Companies Invest in Preparing K–12 Students as Older Sectors Become Tech Integrated https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/companies-invest-preparing-k-12-students-older-sectors-become-tech-integrated <span>Companies Invest in Preparing K–12 Students as Older Sectors Become Tech Integrated</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/k12/user/9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Mon, 09/10/2018 - 13:50</span> <div><p>Technology giants are working to <strong>bolster K–12 education in middle America</strong>, specifically targeting subjects that will help young students learn the skills they’ll need as traditional jobs like agriculture and manufacturing evolve with the rise of emerging technology.</p> <p>Work in rural, agricultural America has seen major disruption from innovative technology, globalization and a shift away from resources like coal and steel. At the same time, major <strong>companies are recognizing the potential of a generation</strong> that will be looking for jobs as the market for jobs in these fields changes — and offers new options to workers and employers. </p> <p>“It is our job as parents, educators and technology creators to <strong>encourage children to test the waters of STEM</strong>, whether they simply want exposure to science and technology, or they have a curiosity as to how to design and launch a rocket,” Ann Woo, senior director of corporate citizenship at <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/samsung-interstitial.html%20?enkwrd=Samsung" target="_blank">Samsung</a> Electronics North America, wrote in the <a href="https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/news/2018/07/12/op-ed-companies-need-to-step-up-when-it-comes-to.html" target="_blank">Houston Business Journal</a>. “Many science and engineering ideas come to life through the devices we hold in our hands, but cutting-edge technologies aren’t easily available to every young person.”</p> <p>Increased STEM funding from private companies comes as Americans <strong>raise concerns over the attention</strong> science, technology, engineering and math classes get in the U.S. education system.</p> <p>According to a recent <a href="http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2018/01/09/women-and-men-in-stem-often-at-odds-over-workplace-equity/" target="_blank">Pew survey</a>, just <strong>61 percent</strong> of those surveyed thought K–12 schools were properly teaching reading, writing and math, and <strong>only 25 percent</strong> thought schools were giving STEM classes enough time in the classroom.</p> <p>“People saw problems stemming from parents, problems stemming from students, as well as problems stemming from teaching style,” Cary Funk, director of science and society research at Pew and the study’s lead author told <a href="https://hechingerreport.org/americans-say-u-s-stem-education-middling-new-poll-finds/" target="_blank">The Hechinger Report</a>.</p> <p><em>Jobs are changing and so is the workforce. <a href="http://www.cdw.com/modernworkforce">Download CDW’s Modern Workforce Insight Report</a><b> </b>to learn more about how companies are addressing these modern challenges.</em></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Microsoft Invests in American Agriculture</h2> <p>To help prepare young rural Americans for the <strong>new demands of a tech-integrated workforce</strong>, <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/microsoft-interstitial.html?enkwrd=Microsoft" target="_blank">Microsoft</a> <a href="https://edscoop.com/future-farmers-of-america-microsoft-partner-to-develop-tech-based-agricultural-curriculum" target="_blank">has partnered</a> with the National Future Farmers of America to invest in agricultural education, EdScoop reports.</p> <p>The partnership, called “Blue 365,” will focus on some of the <strong>most common tech solutions being introduced into the agricultural sphere</strong>, including cloud technology, robotics and advanced communications, according to Mary Snapp, corporate vice president and lead for Microsoft Philanthropies. </p> <p>“Since our nation’s beginning,<strong> the farm has been a foundation of American society</strong>, but too often rural communities do not have broadband access or don’t have access to the digital skills needed on today’s modern farms,” Snapp <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/fostering-agricultural-leaders-lead-economy-tomorrow-mary-snapp-1c/?trk=aff_src.aff-lilpar_c.partners_pkw.10078_net.mediapartner_plc.Skimbit%20Ltd._pcrid.449670_learning&amp;veh=aff_src.aff-lilpar_c.partners_pkw.10078_net.mediapartner_plc.Skimbit%20Ltd._pcrid.449670_learning&amp;irgwc=1" target="_blank">wrote in a blog post</a>. “As a company that develops technology that plays a role in transforming society, we have a responsibility to help people across all geographies <strong>gain access to opportunities and skills</strong> that will help them participate, and thrive, in the digital economy.”</p> <p>In addition to this new program, which will be unveiled in Indianapolis this October, Microsoft announced it would lower the price for classroom technology, including the <a href="https://www.cdw.com/product/Lenovo-100e-Chromebook-11.6-Celeron-N3350-4-GB-RAM-32-GB-SSD/4977298" target="_blank">Lenovo 100e</a> and laptops that run <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/office365.html?enkwrd=Office%20365" target="_blank">Office 365</a>, in order to <strong>help schools in lower-income areas</strong>, such as those in rural counties where agricultural and manufacturing jobs have traditionally been more prevalent. </p> <p>“Affordability is the top priority for many schools,” wrote Yusuf Mehdi, Microsoft’s corporate vice president for Windows and devices, <a href="https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/01/22/microsoft-education-unveils-new-windows-10-devices-starting-at-189-office-365-tools-for-personalized-learning-and-curricula-to-ignite-a-passion-for-stem/" target="_blank">in a blog post</a>. “Shrinking budgets can lead schools to choose devices with a stripped-down experience and a limited lifespan, unfortunately costing more over time and offering less to students.”</p> <h2 id="toc_1">Google Offers Digital Skills Workshops and Coaches</h2> <p>While Microsoft is investing directly in agricultural studies, <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/google.html?enkwrd=Google" target="_blank">Google</a> is using a <strong>mix of digital training programs and affordable tools</strong> to introduce new technology solutions to students in rural communities.</p> <p>“<a href="https://grow.google/" target="_blank">Grow with Google</a>,” a hub for teachers announced late last year, offers <strong>digital workshops on skills in high demand by employers</strong>, which teachers can use in tandem with <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/Computers/Notebook-Computers/?w=C3&amp;pCurrent=1&amp;key=chromebooks&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1&amp;ln=0&amp;enkwrd=chromebook" target="_blank">Chromebooks</a> to give their students an edge for their future in a competitive, tech-driven workforce. </p> <p>The site has tips on everything from <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=Virtual%20Reality&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">using virtual and augmented reality</a> in the classroom to creating a computer science club, and also features professional-development offerings for teachers who need to boost their own technology skills.</p> <p>“We understand there’s uncertainty and even concern about the pace of technological change,” Google CEO Sundar Pichai <a href="https://www.blog.google/outreach-initiatives/grow-with-google/opportunity-for-everyone/" target="_blank">wrote in a blog post </a>after announcing the initiative at an event in Pittsburgh, Penn. “But we know that technology will be an engine of America’s growth for years to come.”</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"><img src="/k12/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/headshot.jpeg.jpg?itok=QfIQ8S6q" width="58" height="58" alt="Eli Zimmerman" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"> <div>Eli Zimmerman</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=eaztweets&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Eli has been eagerly pursuing a journalistic career since he left the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill School of Journalism. Previously, Eli was a staff reporter for medical trade publication <em>Frontline Medical News,</em> where he experienced the impact of continuous education and evolving teaching methods through the medical lens. When not in the office, Eli is busy scanning the web for the latest podcasts or stepping into the boxing ring for a few rounds.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 10 Sep 2018 17:50:56 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41306 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Experts Weigh in on Key Considerations for K–12 1:1 Programs https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/experts-weigh-key-considerations-k-12-11-programs <span>Experts Weigh in on Key Considerations for K–12 1:1 Programs</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/k12/user/9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Fri, 09/07/2018 - 14:15</span> <div><p>Before implementing a one-to-one device program, school districts should have <strong>a well-structured integration plan in place</strong>, according to experts at the <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/iste-2018">International Society for Technology in Education 2018</a> conference earlier this year.</p> <p>From training teachers to choosing the right network, bringing personal devices into the classroom is a lot of work. But, done correctly, there can be many rewards. </p> <h2 id="toc_0">Schools May Miss Important Internet Questions</h2> <p>When schools are configuring their networks to support a one-to-one program, IT teams need to <strong>delve deep</strong> into their current infrastructure to understand what needs to be changed.</p> <p>“You also <strong>have to think about the different kinds of Wi-Fi</strong>,” says Scott Harris, technology director for Missouri’s <a href="https://www.neoshosd.org/" target="_blank">Neosho School District</a>. “Are they going to be [802.11]ac, which is the real fast Wi-Fi? And are your access points able to do that?”</p> <p>If your infrastructure cannot handle the lift of a one-to-one device program, your school may want to invest in assessing and refreshing its network. </p> <p>In New York, the <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/07/how-roll-out-chromebooks-your-district-jiffy">Beekmantown Central School District did just that</a>, investing in <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/cisco.html?enkwrd=Cisco" target="_blank">Cisco</a> Power over Ethernet switches and <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=802.11ac%20wireless%20access%20points&amp;ctlgfilter=&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">802.11ac access points</a> in order to prepare for their one-to-one program.</p> <h2 id="toc_1">Prepare Your Teachers for What’s Ahead</h2> <p>It’s not enough to give teachers a stack of devices and ask them to put them into the curriculum, says Mike Ribble, director of technology for the <a href="http://www.usd383.org/manhattan-ogden" target="_blank">Manhattan-Ogden Unified School District</a> in Kansas. You have to take a moment to <strong>get to know the faculty you’re dealing with</strong>.</p> <p>“When you’re trying to get started in a one-to-one, I think you really need to do your homework, spend your time understanding who your players are,” Ribble tells <em>EdTech</em> . “Even though we worked with our teachers beforehand, I think it was different for them once they had [devices] in their hands.”</p> <p><script type="text/javascript" src="//sc.liveclicker.net/service/getEmbed?client_id=1526&amp;widget_id=1388479575&amp;width=640&amp;height=360"></script></p> <p>At the <a href="https://soe.lmu.edu/centers/ideal/" target="_blank">Innovation in Digital Education and Leadership Institute</a>, schools looking to successfully plan <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/08/what-k-12-administrators-should-think-about-when-integrating-classroom-tech">a training program</a> should give teachers plenty of time to work with the tech, <strong>stick with a few specific initiatives</strong> and have a clear vision educators will be able to follow. </p> <p>Schools can also take advantage of online resources for training programs. For example, for teachers <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/08/google-classroom-updates-k-12-teachers-should-know">introducing Chromebooks</a> into the classroom, <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/google-interstitial.html" target="_blank">Google</a> offers a number of training videos through its <a href="https://teachercenter.withgoogle.com/first-day-trainings/welcome-to-classroom?_ga=2.51715488.8291162.1535462002-855839774.1533565461" target="_blank">Teacher Center</a>.</p> <h2 id="toc_2">Think About Device Use Outside of the Classroom</h2> <p>It’s somewhat easy for schools to keep a watchful eye on device use and management when students are in class, but <strong>what happens when students take their devices home?</strong></p> <p>Schools need to consider issues including insurance and how students will get onto the internet to do their work, says Ribble. </p> <p>The issue of internet access is especially important. The “homework gap,” a <strong>widening split in academic success</strong> between students who have internet access at home and students, usually from low-income households, who do not, is a pervasive issue among K–12 school districts interested in one-to-one device initiatives.</p> <p>For some districts, the answer has been to <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2017/11/iot-powers-connected-k-12-schools-future">equip school buses with Wi-Fi access</a>. Others are creating maps for students to <strong>find free Wi-Fi zones in their areas</strong>, <a href="https://www.districtadministration.com/article/STEM-for-small-town-schools" target="_blank"><em>District Administration </em>reports</a>. Administrators can also <a href="https://www.eschoolnews.com/2018/07/31/5-grants-to-address-digital-inequities-and-fund-classrooms/" target="_blank">apply for grants</a> specifically designed to help combat the digital divide to help augment government funding.</p> <p>It’s also important for schools to create rules for how students should be using their devices when they are not on school property, says David Andrade, a K–12 education strategist for CDW-G. </p> <p>“Who’s responsible for its damage? Are you <strong>monitoring what the students are doing</strong> at home? Are you filtering what they are able to access on that device no matter where they got it? Or is it when they are at home, it’s left up to the parents?” Andrade says these are questions schools should be asking themselves. </p> <p>Learning from schools who have already successfully rolled out a device program or bringing in a third party as an adviser can be extremely helpful, says Andrade.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"><img src="/k12/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/headshot.jpeg.jpg?itok=QfIQ8S6q" width="58" height="58" alt="Eli Zimmerman" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"> <div>Eli Zimmerman</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=eaztweets&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Eli has been eagerly pursuing a journalistic career since he left the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill School of Journalism. Previously, Eli was a staff reporter for medical trade publication <em>Frontline Medical News,</em> where he experienced the impact of continuous education and evolving teaching methods through the medical lens. When not in the office, Eli is busy scanning the web for the latest podcasts or stepping into the boxing ring for a few rounds.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 07 Sep 2018 18:15:54 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41291 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12