EdTech Magazine - Technology Solutions That Drive Education https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/rss.xml en 3 Ways Microsoft Edge Makes the Internet More Secure https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/05/3-ways-microsoft-edge-makes-internet-more-secure <span>3 Ways Microsoft Edge Makes the Internet More Secure</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/22/2019 - 14:22</span> <div><p>Exposure to malicious websites and downloads is the <strong>main way computers get infected with malware</strong>, so a better browser is one way to tighten security. </p> <p><a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft-interstitial.html?enkwrd=microsoft" target="_blank">Microsoft</a> Edge for <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft/windows-10.html?enkwrd=Windows%2010" target="_blank">Windows 10</a> brings numerous improvements over Internet Explorer. It strips out much of Explorer’s legacy code for a more secure base, and it is bolstered by <strong>several new defense technologies</strong> in Windows 10.</p> <p>Staff, teachers and students can be vulnerable to credential theft and malware infections, so <strong>give them as much protection as possible</strong> by taking advantage of these Edge features. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/12/3-ways-configure-windows-10-distraction-free-experience" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong>Check out three ways to configure windows 10 for a distraction–free experience.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">1. Target Vulnerabilities to Restructure Security Strategy</h2> <p>Edge does away with proprietary ActiveX controls, which were easily exploited in Internet Explorer because of their deep integration with the OS. Any web apps that<strong> rely on ActiveX will need to be rewritten to work in Edge</strong>. (Most commercial websites don’t rely on ActiveX.) </p> <p>Edge blocks Adobe Flash Player by default, because hackers often target it. As an alternative, many sites have already moved to HTML5. When Flash is required, Edge will <strong>prompt users for permission to run it</strong>. Microsoft maintains a list of trusted Flash-based websites that work without users needing to give permission. Schools can also block Flash entirely using Group Policy. </p> <h2 id="toc_1">2. Minimize Exposure to Untrusted Sites </h2> <p>For schools requiring a higher level of security, Windows Defender Application Guard runs Edge in a container that <strong>isolates user sessions from the OS and other applications</strong>. When WDAG is enabled, any malware that runs in the browser session can’t break out, which protects the integrity of Windows and user data. </p> <p>Closing a WDAG session also deletes any malicious code to which the user was exposed. </p> <p>IT can configure WDAG to open sites that are not trusted and have all other sites run in Edge without protection. Like most security technologies, WDAG has some disadvantages: Users can’t access their favorites in a WDAG session. But staff can <strong>enable data persistence so that users’ favorites and cookies are maintained</strong> across WDAG sessions. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/12/5-tips-k-12-schools-switching-windows-10" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong>Here are five steps for K–12 schools making the switch to Windows 10.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_2">3. Improve Authentication for K–12 Users Beyond Passwords</h2> <p>Microsoft <strong>discourages passwords because they are so easily compromised</strong>. Windows Hello lets users log in to Windows with a gesture, such as a PIN code or biometric authentication. Edge now supports Windows Hello, so users can sign in to websites this way. </p> <p>Microsoft’s login site also supports Windows Hello, so users can <strong>access their Microsoft account using a PIN, gesture or security key</strong>. </p> <p>Microsoft has been working with the FIDO Alliance to create Web Authentication, a standard also supported by Google, that supports logging in to sites using Windows Hello or portable FIDO2 security keys. Few commercial sites support FIDO currently, but <strong>schools can FIDO-enable their own sites</strong>.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/k12/higher/author/russell-smith"><img src="/k12/k12/k12/higher/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/russell_smith_hed.jpg?itok=25dOyqnM" width="58" height="58" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/k12/higher/author/russell-smith"> <div>Russell Smith</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=smithrussell&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Russell Smith is a technology consultant and trainer specializing in management and security of Microsoft server and client technologies. He is a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer with more than 15 years of experience.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 22 May 2019 18:22:23 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 42306 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 How K–12 Schools Can Balance Privacy and Security Protocols https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/05/how-k-12-schools-can-balance-privacy-and-security-protocols <span>How K–12 Schools Can Balance Privacy and Security Protocols</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/21/2019 - 09:25</span> <div><p>As technology becomes more ubiquitous, schools <strong>must balance student access with student privacy laws</strong>. </p> <p>There is a vast array of platforms available to schools and educators, which can make it difficult to stay abreast of protocols for disclosing personal information, especially when using third-party applications. </p> <p>To offer some insight, the <a href="https://staysafeonline.org/blog/keeping-student-data-private/" target="_blank">National Cyber Security Alliance</a> offers guidance on using technology that adheres to the requirements of the <a href="https://www2.ed.gov/ferpa" target="_blank">Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act</a>. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/02/tcea-2019-ed-tech-expands-so-do-privacy-concerns" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong>Check out how data privacy concerns are expanding with education technology use.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Educators Should Take Responsibility for Student Data Privacy</h2> <p>As education transitions into the digital space, private student data is now being collected in <strong>student information systems, learning management systems and other educational applications</strong>. </p> <p>Teachers often use this data to enhance their instruction and target student needs, but they also need to protect their students. </p> <p>It is crucial that educators <strong>understand the ways student data is collected and secured on all technological platforms</strong> so that they do not violate legal or ethical guidelines. </p> <p>There are education technology curricula available that promote privacy procedures and educate students about online safety. <a href="https://www.commonsense.org/education/teaching-strategies/protect-your-students-data-and-privacy" target="_blank">Common Sense Education</a>, for example, offers tips and tools to engage students in smart digital citizenship practices.</p> <h2 id="toc_1">The First Step Is to Understand Student Data</h2> <p>Student records were originally regarded as personal information held by the educational institution under the protection of FERPA. However, <a href="https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2018/1/privacy-laws-protecting-student-data" target="_blank">many states</a> have extended regulations to cover all information collected from modern technology applications. </p> <p>This means schools <strong>must have a secure infrastructure that can prevent cyberthreats</strong> and protect student information stored in their digital systems. </p> <p>Schools may consider investing in effective security measures such as <a href="https://cdw-prod.adobecqms.net/content/dam/cdw/on-domain-cdw/solutions/cybersecurity/solution-spotlight-endpoint-security.pdf" target="_blank">next-generation endpoint security</a> or <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/solutions/data-center-and-network-infrastructure/it-infrastructure.html" target="_blank">hyperconverged infrastructure</a>. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/03/hyperconvergence-hits-mainstream-k-12-data-centers" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong>Hyperconvergence has arrived in mainstream K–12 data centers.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_2">Evaluate Technology Tools for Effective Data Privacy</h2> <p>When considering implementing a new tech tool, schools should first look to see if they already have a list of approved applications in place.</p> <p>Approved applications and websites do not keep ownership of the data and have appropriate privacy protections. Schools “<strong>must ensure that it retains direct control over the information</strong> the company collects, uses, and maintains,” according to the Future of Privacy Forum’s report, “<a href="https://www.connectsafely.org/wp-content/uploads/Educators-Guide-Data-.pdf" target="_blank">The Educator’s Guide to Student Data Privacy.</a>” “Schools are responsible for seeing that companies working with the school directly only use student information for authorized educational purposes.” </p> <p><a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft-hardware/microsoft-for-education.html" target="_blank">Microsoft for Education</a> and <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/google.html" target="_blank">Google for Education</a> have already complied with these regulations and are widely used across U.S. schools. </p> <p>For schools looking to adopt a new technology tool, it is essential to <strong>evaluate how a new solution protects your students’ information</strong>. For instance, does an app collect personally identifiable information, such as the child’s name or age? Does the app share or sell information to any other third party? If so, it should not be used. </p> <p>Most importantly, does the app allow parents to access student data? It must do so in order to be in compliance with FERPA. </p> <p>All of these considerations determine <strong>whether the educational tool enhances learning while protecting students</strong>. Common Sense Education can help schools <a href="https://privacy.commonsense.org/" target="_blank">evaluate the privacy policies</a> of their external applications and see how those policies align with regulations. </p> <p>Technology is constantly evolving in the education sphere. Schools must be quick to adapt to policy changes, do the research and use their best judgment to ensure that any new technology protects students.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:150%"><p></p></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/k12/k12/higher/taxonomy/term/11721"><img src="/k12/k12/k12/k12/higher/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/Katelyn%20Sweeney.jpeg.jpg?itok=dwNRrhmu" width="58" height="58" alt="Katelyn Sweeney" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/k12/k12/higher/taxonomy/term/11721"> <div>Katelyn Sweeney</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Katelyn has a degree in Childhood and Adolescent Education. Over the past four years, she has taught English and quickly became a huge advocate for digital literacy and integrative technology in the classroom.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 21 May 2019 13:25:41 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 42301 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Q&A: Tarah Luster Explains How to Teach K–12 Students Digital Responsibility https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/05/qa-tarah-luster-explains-how-teach-k-12-students-digital-responsibility <span>Q&amp;A: Tarah Luster Explains How to Teach K–12 Students Digital Responsibility</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Fri, 05/17/2019 - 10:40</span> <div><p>With easier access to social media platforms through mobile devices, students are spending significantly more time online. While technology can open many doors for learning, it can also be a breeding ground for <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/k-12-schools-overlook-few-common-cyberthreats">cyberbullying and identity theft</a>. </p> <p>The realities of social media, both good and bad, spurred organizations like <a href="https://projectb3.org/" target="_blank">Project B3</a> to step in to teach students <strong>how to participate online in a healthy, thoughtful and safe way</strong>. </p> <p><em>EdTech</em> sat down with Tarah Luster, director of Project B3, to learn more about the organization’s <strong>unique approach to getting students invested in digital literacy</strong> campaigns.</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/04/digital-literacy-programs-prepare-students-tech-enabled-future" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> Check out how digital citizenship programs prepare students for a tech–enabled world.</em></a></p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>What is Project B3’s program and how does it help cultivate proper digital citizenship?</h2> <div style="padding: 5px; width: 299px; color: rgb(236, 236, 236); margin-bottom: 10px; margin-left: 15px; float: right; background-color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/TarahLuster.png" style="width: 299px; height: 382px;" title="“Dan" /><br /><span style="color: #939393; font-size: 10px;">Photo: Courtesy of Tarah Luster</span> <div style="font-size: 18px;">Tarah Luster,Project B3 Director</div> </div> <p><strong>LUSTER: </strong>Project B3 takes a really simple approach. These three Bs stand for “<strong>Be safe, Be smart, Be kind.</strong>” We talk with students about their responsibility for their own devices and their own use of internet and social media. </p> <p>We're trying to instill in students that they have this amazing tool at their disposal, and they can put it to good use or bad use. It's their responsibility to use it in the right way. </p> <p>One of the unique things we're doing is <strong>using peer-to-peer education</strong>. We have student leaders who get trained to talk to their peers. </p> <p>This approach is meant to focus on their future. We talk with students about how, the minute they get a device or have an online presence,<strong> what they do reflects on them and can affect their future in some way</strong>. </p> <p>We point out to students how to avoid the pitfalls, like posting things that might display them in a negative light, and also how technology and social media can help them get into college or have a successful career.</p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>What is the importance of having a peer-to-peer program to teach digital responsibility?</h2> <p><strong>LUSTER: </strong>When it comes to digital responsibility, and anything as far as technology goes, relevance is incredibly important. We want to stay relevant because social media is constantly changing. We don't know what apps kids are using now or what games are the most popular or even the terms that they're using online. </p> <p>Student leaders are the most relevant participants online because they share their fellow students’ experiences. Simply put, <strong>they have more information than we do</strong>. </p> <p>Also, what we have found is students tend to listen to their peers more than they listen to parents and teachers. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/06/top-3-elements-student-digital-citizenship" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong>See the top three elements of K–12 student digital citizenship programs.</em></a></p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>How do you prepare student leaders to be effective digital responsibility teachers?</h2> <p><strong>LUSTER: </strong>Usually, students are chosen by administrators or teachers, whom we spend time training. This starts by having an initial conversation, so we know what's going on in their school. The conversation will cover what apps and games are popular among students, what kinds of problems they are running into online, what concerns students might have, and what practices students think they are already really good at. </p> <p>Then, <strong>we share a student leader guide</strong> that helps them focus on the topics they touched on. This helps them design relevant and informative presentations for the rest of their school.</p> <p>Additionally, we have them<strong> design a questionnaire to start a conversation in the classroom</strong>. </p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>Why is this the right approach, as opposed to simply banning social media or phone use on school grounds?</h2> <p><strong>LUSTER: </strong>There are a lot of schools that will say their students aren't allowed to use Instagram, so it’s not an issue for them, or their students aren't allowed to use their phones in school. </p> <p>However, the reality is <strong>students are on those apps whether they are in school or not</strong>. Do schools think students are not on Instagram? Do they think they're not Snapchatting the minute they get on the bus? </p> <p>We don't think digital responsibility has to be a constant message, but schools do have to look at it like they would warn students not to talk to strangers. </p> <p>Kids hear about the “stranger danger” over and over again until it's ingrained in their head. There <strong>needs to be a similar program for digital citizenship</strong> because these kids are online all the time. Whether they are using social media in school or not doesn’t mean the danger isn’t present.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/k12/higher/author/eli-zimmerman"><img src="/k12/k12/k12/higher/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/headshot.jpeg.jpg?itok=QfIQ8S6q" width="58" height="58" alt="Eli Zimmerman" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/k12/higher/author/eli-zimmerman"> <div>Eli Zimmerman</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=eaztweets&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Eli has been eagerly pursuing a journalistic career since he left the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill School of Journalism. Previously, Eli was a staff reporter for medical trade publication <em>Frontline Medical News,</em> where he experienced the impact of continuous education and evolving teaching methods through the medical lens. When not in the office, Eli is busy scanning the web for the latest podcasts or stepping into the boxing ring for a few rounds.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 17 May 2019 14:40:16 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 42296 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Fact or Fallacy: What’s the State of Digital Learning in Schools? https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/05/fact-or-fallacy-whats-state-digital-learning-schools <span>Fact or Fallacy: What’s the State of Digital Learning in Schools?</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Thu, 05/16/2019 - 15:20</span> <div><p>What is the current state of digital learning in schools? Our own experiences, both positive and negative, can influence our perspective on this topic. As educators, we may have <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/02/k-12-teachers-use-virtual-and-augmented-reality-platforms-teach-coding-perfcon">led engaging lessons where students explored a new place</a> with a virtual reality tool. We may have <strong>seen the power of students building confidence</strong> for public speaking by participating in conversations online.</p> <p>At the same time, even the most tech-savvy of us have f<strong>aced challenges with integrating digital learning experiences</strong> into classrooms. </p> <p>Just a few weeks ago, I had to solve a connectivity problem during a<a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft/microsoft-teams.html?enkwrd=%20Skype" target="_blank"> Skype</a> call with an expert — while a group of fifth graders patiently waited for me to resolve it. We’ve all had days when the Wi-Fi is down — or moments when students push the boundaries by responding to a learning prompt with emojis.</p> <p><a href="https://www.schoology.com/state-of-digital-learning" target="_blank">A study released by Schoology</a> this year tackled a few of the challenges that educators, students and families face with technology in the classroom. They received responses from thousands of U.S. educators in a variety of roles. Here’s a look at some of the survey’s key findings on the current state of digital learning. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/04/how-k-12-schools-should-define-and-act-digital-learning" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong>Check out how K–12 schools should be defining digital learning.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Fallacy: Social Media Has No Place in the Classroom</h2> <p>In fact, <strong>social media can be a powerful teaching and learning tool </strong>when used strategically.</p> <p>Are you in a school that encourages, bans or hasn’t taken a position on the use of social media during the school day? According to Schoology’s research, “about <strong>40 percent</strong> of schools allow social media for educational purposes only, while nearly<strong> 20 percent </strong>have an openly permitted social media policy.” </p> <p>Although this may allude to recognition by some schools of the power of social media, access to social media tools doesn’t, on its own, result in purposeful use. Yet social media access does help educators and students form connections with learning partners in other parts of the world and allow them to share their work with an authentic audience. </p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/taxonomy/term/12011"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/Burns_Monica.jpeg.jpg?itok=GK9BxHHn" width="58" height="58" alt="Monica Burns" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/taxonomy/term/12011"> <div>Monica Burns</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Monica Burns is an author, educational technology consultant and the creator of Class Tech Tips, a blog and website with tools for educators.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 16 May 2019 19:20:03 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 42291 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Data Privacy Concerns Get Closer Scrutiny in K–12 Districts https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/data-privacy-concerns-get-closer-scrutiny-k-12-districts <span>Data Privacy Concerns Get Closer Scrutiny in K–12 Districts</span> <div><p>Data privacy is quickly emerging as a top concern for K–12 districts. Leaders and legislators are recognizing that while educational technology brings many benefits, it also creates a responsibility for districts to ensure that student data is not compromised. Experts say that while awareness is growing, there is room for improvement. They recommend that district leaders develop broad programs of data governance, take advantage of resources designed to support program development and create step-by-step plans to tackle one piece of the puzzle at a time.</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/amyburroughs26341" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">amy.burroughs_26341</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/15/2019 - 13:46</span> <div> <div>Tweet text</div> <div>#DataPrivacy is a concern in #K12, and educators are starting to become more aware of the risks and responsibilities of #edtech integration. </div> </div> <div> <div>Video ID</div> <div><p>1624340907</p> </div> </div> <div> <div>CDW Activity ID</div> <div><p>MKT 34078</p> </div> </div> <div> <div>CDW VV2 Strategy</div> <div>Security</div> </div> <div> <div>CDW Segment</div> <div>K-12</div> </div> <div> <div>Customer Focused</div> <div>False</div> </div> <div> <div>Buying Cycle</div> <div><a href="/k12/taxonomy/term/7446" hreflang="en">Engagement</a></div> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-vertical" data-layout="vertical" data-url="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/data-privacy-concerns-get-closer-scrutiny-k-12-districts" data-title="#DataPrivacy is a concern in #K12, and educators are starting to become more aware of the risks and responsibilities of #edtech integration." data-via="EdTech_K12" data-button-background="none"> <span> <span>May</span> <span>15</span> <span>2019</span> </span> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-pinterest cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-url="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/data-privacy-concerns-get-closer-scrutiny-k-12-districts" data-title="#DataPrivacy is a concern in #K12, and educators are starting to become more aware of the risks and responsibilities of #edtech integration." data-via="EdTech_K12" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="twitter"></span> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="facebook"></span> </div> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-counter="true" data-url="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/data-privacy-concerns-get-closer-scrutiny-k-12-districts" data-title="#DataPrivacy is a concern in #K12, and educators are starting to become more aware of the risks and responsibilities of #edtech integration." data-via="EdTech_K12" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a href="https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=https%3A%2F%2Fedtechmagazine.com%2Fk12%2Frss.xml%3Fdestination%3D%2Fk12%2F%26amp%3B_exception_statuscode%3D404" target="_blank"><span class="pw-box-counter cdw-taboola" data-channel="twitter"></span></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-pinterest cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> </div> <div> <div>Pull Quote</div> <div> <p class="quote"><a href="node/"> What I encourage folks to do is look at data governance as a whole unit. </a></p> <img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/photo_quote_thumb/public/2019-05/Melissa%20Tebbenkamp.jpeg.jpg?itok=SjRMQS9y" width="60" height="60" alt="Melissa Tebbenkamp, Instructional Technology Director, Raytown Quality Schools" typeof="foaf:Image" /> <p class='speaker'> <span>Melissa Tebbenkamp</span> Instructional Technology Director, Raytown Quality Schools </p> </div> </div> Wed, 15 May 2019 17:46:25 +0000 amy.burroughs_26341 42286 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 K–12 Educators Emphasize Personalized Learning for Class of 2030 https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/k-12-educators-emphasize-personalized-learning-class-2030 <span>K–12 Educators Emphasize Personalized Learning for Class of 2030</span> <div><p>Members of the Class of 2030 are just starting their educational careers, and they'll graduate into a world that may look very different from the one we know today. Artificial intelligence, virtual reality, data analytics and other emerging technologies are expected to take on a big role in education. It's nearly impossible to predict exactly what that will look like, but experts do believe that these new tools have huge potential for personalized learning, tailored to the needs of each individual student.</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/amyburroughs26341" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">amy.burroughs_26341</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/15/2019 - 12:48</span> <div> <div>Tweet text</div> <div>#K12 educators must start tackling the challenge of how to prepare members of the Class of 2030 for the world into which they will graduate. Some experts say that&#039;s going to feature #PersonalizedLearning in a big way. #edtech</div> </div> <div> <div>Video ID</div> <div><p>1323831985</p> </div> </div> <div> <div>video type</div> <div><a href="/k12/taxonomy/term/7396" hreflang="en">Conference</a></div> </div> <div> <div>CDW Activity ID</div> <div><p>MKT 34078</p> </div> </div> <div> <div>CDW VV2 Strategy</div> <div>Core</div> </div> <div> <div>CDW Segment</div> <div>K-12</div> </div> <div> <div>Customer Focused</div> <div>False</div> </div> <div> <div>Buying Cycle</div> <div><a href="/k12/taxonomy/term/7446" hreflang="en">Engagement</a></div> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-vertical" data-layout="vertical" data-url="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/k-12-educators-emphasize-personalized-learning-class-2030" data-title="#K12 educators must start tackling the challenge of how to prepare members of the Class of 2030 for the world into which they will graduate. Some experts say that's going to feature #PersonalizedLearning in a big way. #edtech" data-via="EdTech_K12" data-button-background="none"> <span> <span>May</span> <span>15</span> <span>2019</span> </span> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-pinterest cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-url="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/k-12-educators-emphasize-personalized-learning-class-2030" data-title="#K12 educators must start tackling the challenge of how to prepare members of the Class of 2030 for the world into which they will graduate. Some experts say that's going to feature #PersonalizedLearning in a big way. #edtech" data-via="EdTech_K12" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="twitter"></span> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="facebook"></span> </div> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-counter="true" data-url="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/media/video/k-12-educators-emphasize-personalized-learning-class-2030" data-title="#K12 educators must start tackling the challenge of how to prepare members of the Class of 2030 for the world into which they will graduate. Some experts say that's going to feature #PersonalizedLearning in a big way. #edtech" data-via="EdTech_K12" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a href="https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=https%3A%2F%2Fedtechmagazine.com%2Fk12%2Frss.xml%3Fdestination%3D%2Fk12%2F%26amp%3B_exception_statuscode%3D404" target="_blank"><span class="pw-box-counter cdw-taboola" data-channel="twitter"></span></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-pinterest cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> </div> <div> <div>Pull Quote</div> <div> <p class="quote"><a href="node/"> There are rapid and sustained technological changes that are reshaping work. </a></p> <img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/photo_quote_thumb/public/2019-05/Steve%20Langford.jpg?itok=HIKaduhz" width="60" height="60" alt="Steven Langford, CIO, Beaverton School District" typeof="foaf:Image" /> <p class='speaker'> <span>Steven Langford</span> CIO, Beaverton School District </p> </div> </div> Wed, 15 May 2019 16:48:29 +0000 amy.burroughs_26341 42281 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 K–12 Schools Find Educational Benefits in Cloud-Based Gaming https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/05/k-12-schools-find-educational-benefits-cloud-based-gaming <span>K–12 Schools Find Educational Benefits in Cloud-Based Gaming </span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/15/2019 - 09:59</span> <div><p>Six years ago, mixed reality game designer <a href="https://janemcgonigal.com/" target="_blank">Jane McGonigal</a>’s <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2013/06/iste-2013-5-takeaways-jane-mcgonigals-opening-keynote">keynote</a> at the 2013 ISTE conference focused on how video games can boost resilience in real life. She referenced about <a href="https://www.geekwire.com/2013/gaming-report-12-billion-people-playing-games-worldwide/" target="_blank">1 billion gamers worldwide</a>. </p> <p>When the crowd groaned, McGonigal said, “Maybe we think of gaming as a waste of time ... but I am here today to hopefully persuade those of you who think that way that <strong>1 billion gamers</strong> is maybe, actually, the best news you will hear all week.”</p> <p>Since then, research has shown that video games offer a wealth of benefits, <a href="http://news.msu.edu/media/documents/2011/11/33ba0f16-a2e9-4d36-b063-2f540f115970.pdf" target="_blank">from increasing creativity in children</a> to <a href="https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01398566" target="_blank">helping people heal faster in hospitals</a>.</p> <p>A majority of educators agree that video games can help K–12 learning. In a <a href="http://images.email.blackboard.com/Web/BlackboardInc/%7B759c39e7-7194-4d2f-9572-5429cd50e141%7D_K12_2018_Report_TrendsInDigitalLearning-NewLearningLeader.pdf" target="_blank">recent study from educational nonprofit Project Tomorrow</a>, nearly <strong>62 percent of teachers </strong>reported using video games in their classrooms.</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/esports-programs-start-pop-k-12-schools" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> Check out how K–12 schools are building their esports programs.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Gaming Enters a New Era: Cloud Streaming</h2> <p>Today, according to gaming analytics firm <a href="https://newzoo.com/insights/articles/global-games-market-reaches-137-9-billion-in-2018-mobile-games-take-half/" target="_blank">Newzoo</a>, the number of gamers has increased to <strong>2 billion worldwide</strong>. Video gaming is becoming a <strong>$140 billion-a-year </strong>business.</p> <p>On the cusp of this burgeoning industry is cloud-based gaming, which <a href="https://techcrunch.com/2019/01/02/will-the-gaming-industry-clutch-up-in-2019/" target="_blank">TechCrunch calls the “new frontier.”</a> Traditional tech giants, along with gaming startups such as <a href="https://store.steampowered.com/" target="_blank">Steam</a>, are rapidly developing platforms and content to gain a foothold in the market. Cloud technology <strong>allows video game streaming on nearly any device</strong>, from smartphones to traditional game consoles.</p> <p>Among the tech behemoths, <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/search/?key=Amazon&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">Amazon</a> and <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/google-interstitial.html?enkwrd=Google" target="_blank">Google</a> are forging inroads in cloud-based gaming. Google is testing <a href="https://wccftech.com/google-feedback-project-stream-positive/" target="_blank">Project Stream</a>, and Amazon is reportedly <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/01/11/amazon-reportedly-developing-subscription-video-game-streaming-service/?utm_term=.b6d765e9cd5d" target="_blank">leveraging its massive cloud presence</a> to develop its own service.</p> <p>But <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft-interstitial.html?enkwrd=Microsoft" target="_blank">Microsoft</a>’s <a href="https://blogs.microsoft.com/blog/2018/10/08/project-xcloud-gaming-with-you-at-the-center/" target="_blank">Project xCloud</a> may be the furthest along. With its deep roots in gaming via Xbox and its recent purchases of <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/search/?key=Minecraft&amp;ctlgfilter=&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">Minecraft </a>and cloud-gaming platform <a href="https://playfab.com/" target="_blank">PlayFab</a>, Microsoft has the <strong>greatest potential to break into the education market </strong>before its competitors.</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/12/k-12-schools-see-emergence-esports-clubs-infographic" target="_blank"><img alt="esports infographic" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/EdK-12-eSports-Infographic_VisualCTA.jpg" /></a></p> <h2 id="toc_1">Why Cloud Gaming Is Taking Off Now in Classrooms</h2> <p>The time is right for cloud-based gaming in schools. Today’s educators who want to <strong>implement digital gaming in the classroom face major barriers</strong>.</p> <p>“Until recently, gaming in education has been very propriety in nature,” <a href="https://www.ndm.edu/directory/ryan-schaaf" target="_blank">says Ryan Schaaf</a>, assistant professor of educational technology at Notre Dame of Maryland University and co-author of the book <em>Game On: Using Digital Games to Transform Teaching, Learning, and Assessment</em>. </p> <p>“School technology typically moves slowly,” he continues. “If a school adopts iPads, teachers can only use games that work with the <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/apple.html?enkwrd=Apple" target="_blank">Apple</a> operating system. The same goes for <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/search/Computers/Notebook-Computers/?w=C3&amp;ln=0&amp;a3407=50713045&amp;enkwrd=+Chromebooks" target="_blank">Chromebooks</a>. You have access to a limited library of games.”</p> <p>At the same time, there’s <strong>little financial reward for developers who focus on instructional games</strong>. As recently as 2017, educational technology experts expressed frustration at the lack of options to market and distribute educational offerings. </p> <p>“How does the developer who is interested in making a phenomenal learning game and whom I want to make 10 learning games work out a way to make games two through 10?” said Mark DeLoura, senior adviser for digital media at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, speaking at the <a href="http://www.gamesandlearning.org/2017/08/04/a-bridge-too-far-effective-distribution-remains-elusive-for-developers-teachers/" target="_blank">2017 Games for Change conference</a> in New York. “Because if they make one and go out of business, we are all at a loss.”</p> <p>Cloud-based gaming can solve these challenges. “Platforms like xCloud and Steam are<strong> trying to make online catalogs that are open to any device</strong>, with games that are easier to download,” says Schaaf said. “This also provides an opportunity for smaller, educational game development companies to put their offerings in the cloud, and all of a sudden they’re seen by millions of people.”</p> <p>A small investment for schools will make it easier to download and try appropriate games. </p> <p>“It’s a smart model,” said Schaaf. “If I want a kid to learn about the Civil War, I’ll be able to find and stream it within 15 minutes. That dream’s not 10 to 15 years away — it’s much closer.”</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/author/erika-gimbel"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/erika-gimbel.jpg?itok=COBsR_2x" width="58" height="58" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/author/erika-gimbel"> <div>Erika Gimbel</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Erika Gimbel is a Chicago-based freelance writer who specializes in B2B technology innovation and educational technology.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 15 May 2019 13:59:34 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 42276 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 K–12 Professional Development Is Critical, So Make It Count https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/05/k-12-professional-development-critical-so-make-it-count <span>K–12 Professional Development Is Critical, So Make It Count</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Mon, 05/13/2019 - 09:35</span> <div><p>While most teachers believe district leaders view professional development as a priority, some say the instruction they’re offered could be more effective, according to <a href="https://learningforward.org/docs/default-source/default-document-library/professional_learning_teacher_survey_2017.pdf" target="_blank">a survey from Corwin, Learning Forward and the National Education Association</a>. Research also suggests teachers wish their districts would increase training on specific topics, notably technology. </p> <p>With one estimate indicating as many as <strong>77 percent </strong>of jobs will require some degree of technological skill by 2020, it’s critical that students are comfortable using technology. Yet only<strong> 10 percent</strong> of educators, who are responsible for preparing students for that future workforce, feel confident teaching higher-level tech skills, according to <a href="https://www.pwc.com/us/en/about-us/corporate-responsibility/assets/pwc-are-we-preparing-our-kids-for-the-jobs-of-tomorrow.pdf" target="_blank">a 2018 PwC survey</a>.</p> <p>Of more than 2,000 K–12 educators who participated in the PwC survey, <strong>79 percent</strong> said they want more training focused on helping them effectively teach technology-related subjects.</p> <p>Other educators desire more hands-on instruction:<strong> 33 percent</strong> said a lack of PD had hindered their ability to use technology in the classroom, according to <a href="https://www.hmhco.com/educator-confidence-report/key-findings" target="_blank">a 2018 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt report</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/how-gamify-professional-development" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> Check out how schools can gamify professional development.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Online PD Modules Give Teachers Flexibility</h2> <p>Professional development has always <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/5-key-areas-technology-professional-development-teachers">been integral to education</a>, and it’s clear that technology has placed new demands on teachers. Increasing integration of technology in the classroom also puts pressure on district leaders to figure out not only <strong>what to address in teacher training, but also how</strong>.</p> <p>Numerous educators, according to the Corwin/Learning Forward/NEA survey, strongly prefer onsite collaborative learning that takes place during the workday. That doesn’t appear to be the norm, however: Just <strong>25 percent say the majority of their PD actually occurs during school hours</strong>. </p> <p>Instead, nearly half of teachers say their training is typically scheduled for in-service days or during the summer, a trend that limits the number of hours schools can dedicate to educator-oriented learning.</p> <p>Eighty-one percent of the educators in PwC’s survey said they’d like to have the <strong>flexibility to be released from traditional classroom duties to attend training</strong>, a strategy that research suggests could increase the effectiveness of in-person instruction.</p> <p>For instance, workshops can provide <strong>extremely beneficial opportunities for hands-on, active learning</strong>. But absorbing those concepts takes time. Studies have shown that training initiatives allowing more than a single day to learn new practices can produce strong results, <a href="https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/sites/default/files/product-files/Effective_Teacher_Professional_Development_BRIEF.pdf" target="_blank">according to the Learning Policy Institute</a>.</p> <p>If educators have only a single afternoon for a face-to-face training session, the format may not be an ideal way to successfully master new strategies. As an alternative, on-demand instructional modules allow teachers to invest more hours in development because they can complete the work at their desired pace and time.</p> <p>In addition, while group-oriented workshops often feature general information for a broad audience, online modules can help schools deliver specific guidance that targets the needs of individual teachers. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/10/k-12-experts-weigh-training-teachers-use-education-technology" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> Check out what K–12 experts have to say about training teachers to use classroom technology.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_1">Instructional Coaches Help Teachers Gain Proficiency and Confidence</h2> <p>Whether instruction occurs in person or remotely, certain elements — in particular, allowing participants to customize their experience — may be the key to successful outcomes.</p> <p>Take the <a href="https://district.wayne.k12.in.us/" target="_blank">Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township</a> in Indianapolis, for example. The district initially tried to boost participation in its voluntary professional development program by having educators work within individualized learning plans created for each person. Then, it decided to offer a group webinar and give teachers the freedom to select their own learning options. Teachers’ participation subsequently increased from <strong>35 percent to 90 percent</strong>, according to an<a href="https://hechingerreport.org/in-professional-development-for-online-teachers-highlighting-failure-led-the-way-to-success/" target="_blank"> article in the Hechinger Report</a>. </p> <p>Providing guidance from an instructional coach is another beneficial approach.</p> <p>During the 2017–2018 school year, the Dynamic Learning Project, an initiative designed by Digital Promise with support from <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/google-interstitial.html?enkwrd=Google" target="_blank">Google</a>, paired teachers in 50 schools across five states — Alabama, California, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Texas — with onsite technology coaches to support their use of educational technology.</p> <p>The program helped teachers become more comfortable with and more skilled at incorporating classroom technologies. <a href="http://digitalpromise.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/DLP_CoachingReport_2018.pdf" target="_blank">According to a report</a> issued after the Dynamic Learning Project’s pilot year, <strong>60 percent </strong>of participating teachers reported progress in their ability to use technology in their teaching practice.</p> <p>Eighty-nine percent said the coaching improved their ability to choose the most effective tech tools, and <strong>77 percent</strong> said they felt better able to communicate with students in a way that resonated. </p> <p>By the end of the year, participants were sold on instructional coaching. Approximately<strong> 90 percent </strong>said the type of support they received could help improve student learning, and nearly <strong>92 percent </strong>believed coaching-related professional development could have a positive effect on student engagement.</p> <p>Choices abound when it comes to professional development, and the need for this support is clear. To help educators make the most of training, leaders would do well to engage teachers in their districts to solicit their input and preferences. That can go a long way to ensure that teachers have the best support possible.</p> <p><em>This article is part of the "Connect IT: Bridging the Gap Between Education and Technology" series. Please join the discussion on Twitter by using the <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23ConnectIT&amp;src=typd" target="_blank">#ConnectIT</a> hashtag.</em></p> <p> </p> <p></p><center><a href="http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/node/11661" target="_blank" title="Connect IT"><img alt="[title]Connect IT: Bridging the Gap Between Education and Technology" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="87" src="http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/sites/default/files/articles/2014/05/connectit.jpg" title="[title]Connect IT: Bridging the Gap Between Education and Technology" width="400" /></a></center> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/taxonomy/term/11796"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/Joe%20Marquez.jpeg.jpg?itok=gjjnx4wg" width="58" height="58" alt="Joe Marquez" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/taxonomy/term/11796"> <div>Joe Marquez</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=@JoeMarquez70&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Joe Marquez is a K–12 Education Strategist with CDW•G. He is a certified Google Innovator and Microsoft Innovative Educator, and an adjunct professor for the Fresno Pacific University Educational Technology master’s program.<p></p></p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 13 May 2019 13:35:44 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 42271 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 How K–12 Schools Can Start an Esports Program https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/05/how-k-12-schools-can-start-esports-program <span>How K–12 Schools Can Start an Esports Program</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/08/2019 - 10:57</span> <div><p>Evidence is building to support the benefits of competitive gaming in K–12 schools, spurring administrators to start programs in their districts. </p> <p>In California, educators at <a href="https://www.svusd.org/schools/high-schools/mission-viejo" target="_blank">Mission Viejo High School</a> can see how the addition of an official esports program helped students develop important team-building skills more commonly associated with traditional athletics. </p> <p>“The kids will say, ‘<strong>We need to communicate better, let’s meet to talk about our strategy</strong>,’” Tiffany Bui, faculty adviser for the Mission Viejo esports team, told <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/esports-programs-start-pop-k-12-schools"><em>EdTech</em></a>. “They’ll talk about what went well, what didn’t go well. It’s interesting to see the players guide each other. You see leaders emerge.”</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/4-surprising-benefits-gaming-k-12-students">Studies found</a> competitive gaming can nurture cognitive growth, boosting problem-solving and spatial reasoning skills. </p> <p>With so much to gain from an esports program, many administrators and IT leaders are wondering how they can bring competitive gaming to their districts. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/12/k-12-schools-see-emergence-esports-clubs-infographic" target="_blank"><img alt="esports infographic" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/EdK-12-eSports-Infographic_VisualCTA.jpg" /></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Partner with Current Leagues to Organize and Fund Programs</h2> <p>Even with research to back up the benefits associated with esports, it can be difficult to allocate resources to support the necessary infrastructure for a competitive team. </p> <p>Established gaming leagues across the country, such as the <a href="https://www.highschoolesportsleague.com/" target="_blank">High School Esports League</a> and <a href="https://www.playvs.com/" target="_blank">PlayVS</a>, often partner with K–12 schools to organize training, competitions and charity events. They’re joined by the <a href="https://legacyesports.com/" target="_blank">Legacy Esports</a>, <a href="http://egfederation.com/" target="_blank">Electronic Gaming Federation</a> and <a href="https://www.esportsfed.org/" target="_blank">North America Scholastic Esports Federation</a> leagues.</p> <p>There are <strong>not many grant opportunities for K–12 esports programs</strong>, but some companies, such as<a href="https://www.eteamsponsor.com/" target="_blank"> eTeamSponsor</a>, offer crowdfunding tools to create campaigns to fund the technology schools need for a proper competitive space. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/10/qa-laz-alberto-describes-rise-high-school-esports" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong>Check out how PlayVS Vice President Laz Alberto expects esports to enter the K–12 space.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_1">Esports Technology K–12 Schools Will Need</h2> <p>What does a proper competitive space look like for K–12? One of the core technologies, of course, is a computer; however, whether <strong>students use a desktop or laptop can be up to the school’s discretion</strong>. </p> <p>At <a href="https://www.fresnounified.org/" target="_blank">Fresno Unified School District</a>, students use <a href="https://www.cdw.com/product/hp-elitebook-850-g5-15.6-core-i7-8550u-16-gb-ram-512-gb-ssd-us/4955235" target="_blank">HP EliteBook 850s</a> to play. <strong>As long as schools have a solid network infrastructure in place</strong>, reliance on laptops should not affect students’ success in competitions. At Fresno USD, for example, the school’s <a href="https://www.cdw.com/product/cisco-aironet-2802i-wireless-access-point/4098916" target="_blank">existing Cisco 802.11ac wireless network</a> worked just fine, according to CTO Kurt Madden.</p> <p>Meanwhile, at Illinois’ <a href="https://www.sd308.org/oehs" target="_blank">Oswego East High School</a>, students go head to head from their <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/computers/?key=dell+optiplex+7020&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1&amp;w=c" target="_blank">Dell OptiPlex 7020 desktop computers</a>. </p> <p>In addition to gaming systems, <strong>schools may want to invest in peripheral equipment</strong>, such as mice, keyboards and headsets for students who do not have their own. </p> <p>Ultimately, esports programs should be about creating new opportunities for students to learn in engaging ways, and to offer more avenues for students to participate in their school. Talking with students about <strong>what they want from an esports program</strong> and getting them involved in the planning process is one of the best ways to get the ball rolling.</p> <p><em>This article is part of the "Connect IT: Bridging the Gap Between Education and Technology" series. Please join the discussion on Twitter by using the <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23ConnectIT&amp;src=typd" target="_blank">#ConnectIT</a> hashtag.</em></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p></p><center><a href="http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/node/11661" target="_blank" title="Connect IT"><img alt="[title]Connect IT: Bridging the Gap Between Education and Technology" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="87" src="http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/sites/default/files/articles/2014/05/connectit.jpg" title="[title]Connect IT: Bridging the Gap Between Education and Technology" width="400" /></a></center> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/k12/k12/higher/author/joe-mcallister"><img src="/k12/k12/k12/higher/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/JoeMcAllister.jpg?itok=wnB4yNmz" width="58" height="58" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/k12/k12/higher/author/joe-mcallister"> <div>Joe McAllister</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Joe McAllister is a learning environment advisor at CDW•G.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 08 May 2019 14:57:08 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 42266 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Biometrics in Schools to Yield Security Benefits and Privacy Concerns https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/05/biometrics-schools-yield-security-benefits-and-privacy-concerns <span>Biometrics in Schools to Yield Security Benefits and Privacy Concerns</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/07/2019 - 14:04</span> <div><p>Biometric technology is already part of the K–12 ecosystem, where <strong>administrators are using iris scans and “facial fingerprints”</strong> to grant access to buildings and computer labs, track attendance, manage lunch payments, loan library materials and ensure students get on the right buses. </p> <p>Biotech is also touted as a security measure, particularly for young students who haven’t yet mastered the use of passwords. </p> <p>“We wanted to <strong>use it for younger children to log in to launch pads for their resources</strong>,” says Serena E. Sacks, CIO of <a href="https://www.fultonschools.org/" target="_blank">Fulton County Schools</a> in Georgia, describing the school system’s exploration of facial recognition scans. “This is something that would make it easier for students to access digital resources without using anonymous or generic logins.” </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/02/biometric-technology-tracks-students-attention" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong>Check out how K–12 schools can use biometrics to measure student engagement.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Biometrics Prompt Districts to Consider Data Storage and Access</h2> <p>Like many districts, Fulton County has yet to implement the technology, both for logistical reasons (not enough cameras that can read scans, for instance) and <strong>out of concern for data privacy</strong>. </p> <p>If someday the district does implement a biometric program, says Hoke Wilcox, director of instructional technology, the login “would be kept locally, so it’s not something that’s stored elsewhere.”</p> <p>That’s important, Wilcox says, because the <strong>expansion of biometrics in schools is likely to fuel questions about the security</strong> of those scans, on top of the worries about student privacy. </p> <p>Much of the data that schools retain is considered “directory information,” says Rachael Stickland, co-chair of the <a href="https://www.studentprivacymatters.org/" target="_blank">Parent Coalition for Student Privacy</a>. That’s information such as students’ names, physical addresses, email addresses and other records. The <strong>chain of custody for that data, and what happens with it</strong>, isn’t always clear — especially when educational technology companies are bought and sold, she says. </p> <p>The same goes for information collected in behavior management apps and biometric applications. </p> <p>“There’s no real starting point and end point with so many apps out there and tech products that are <strong>getting data from every single angle</strong>,” Stickland says. “The concern is not only that it’s being put in the hands of hackers and leaked onto the internet but also being misused by companies themselves.” </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/08/company-offers-free-facial-recognition-software-boost-school-security" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> See how schools can access facial recognition software to boost security measures.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_1">Experts Predict Expansion of Privacy Concerns in K–12 Schools</h2> <p>For parents to accept biosensors in their children’s schools, says Tovah LaDier, executive director of the <a href="https://www.ibia.org/" target="_blank">International Biometrics + Identity Association</a>, they need to <strong>understand what the technology is and how it’s being used</strong>, and schools can help with that. </p> <p>She also recommends that schools establish safeguards to govern who has access to biometric data and conduct regular audits to ensure databases are protected.</p> <p>Concerns about <strong>apps that track data and don’t disclose what information they’re collecting</strong> is a big topic in Washington, D.C., Stickland notes, primarily in regard to the consumer data privacy. </p> <p>“Everybody assumes that education is different than the consumer space because <strong>we have a lot of laws on the books</strong>,” she says, pointing to legislation such as the <a href="https://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html?" target="_blank">Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act</a> (FERPA), Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment and Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule. “What we’re going to find is that it’s going to happen on a school level. At some point, we’re going to hit a tipping point of ‘Oh my gosh, this has been happening in schools as well.’”</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/author/jen-miller"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/u--2vU_g_400x400.jpg?itok=X9PVb1Ma" width="58" height="58" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/author/jen-miller"> <div>Jen A. Miller</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=byJenAMiller&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Jen A. Miller writes about technology for CIO.com. She's also a contributor to the <em>New York Times</em>, <em>Washington Post</em> and the <em>Guardian</em>. Her most recent book, <em>Running: A Love Story</em> was published in March.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 07 May 2019 18:04:56 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 42261 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12