EdTech Magazine - Technology Solutions That Drive Education https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/rss.xml en Q&A: Kelly Young on Tech's Role in Learner-Centered Education https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/qa-kelly-young-techs-role-learner-centered-education <span>Q&amp;A: Kelly Young on Tech&#039;s Role in Learner-Centered Education</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Mon, 01/21/2019 - 13:49</span> <div><p>Many K–12 educators are pushing back against traditional education models, advocating for<strong> learner-centered education</strong>, which puts study into the hands of students.</p> <p>One way educators are introducing student-centered education into the classroom is through <strong>meaningful integration of educational technology</strong>. </p> <p>As experts at this year’s <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/06/iste-2018-keynote-speaker-urges-educators-adopt-learner-based-experiences">ISTE</a> and <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/02/ice18-redesigning-classroom-not-about-being-pretty-pinterest">ICE</a> conferences have noted, the transformation to learner-centered education is crucial for K–12 schools, and educators have been <strong>using technology solutions to make it a reality</strong>. </p> <p><em>EdTech</em> sat down with Kelly Young, Executive Director of <a href="https://education-reimagined.org/" target="_blank">Education Reimagined</a>, to understand how educational technology fits into the learner-centered education movement, and what kinds of innovations will be necessary in the coming years</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/cdw_insider_registration/register-web" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong>Technology trends universities should expect in 2019.</em></a></p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>How is the exponential growth in educational technology applicable to this new push for learner-centered education?</h2> <div style="float: right; margin-left: 15px; margin-bottom: 10px; width: 299px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; color: #ececec; background-color: #333333;"><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="416" src="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/Kelly%20Young.png" title="Scott Mahler" width="299" /><br /><span style="color: #939393; font-size: 10px;">Photo: Education Reimagined</span> <p style="font-size: 18px;">Kelly Young, Executive Director of Education Reimagined</p> </div> <p><strong>YOUNG: </strong>Technology is in every field, which is making so much more possible and not always in the ways that we think. When people think of educational technology, they usually think of direct learner experience — kids in front of computers. </p> <p>And that is some of what it entails, but, more important, it allows kids to be able to have <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/06/interoperability-boosts-speed-school-communications">portfolios of their learning online</a> so that they can actually<strong> document and demonstrate the learning that they have had</strong>. </p> <p>It also allows for coordination of educators who are not so proximate to one another. </p> <p>So, an educator might have a learning experience at the library or in a museum, and the information about that experience can be <strong>uploaded to a central system so other educators can learn from that</strong>. It also allows for people to learn across the world, redefining a classroom space. </p> <p>Essentially, it creates the opportunity for learning to happen anywhere, and with a lot of different people. And in the specific capacity of learner-centered education, it certainly makes it more scalable. </p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>What is technology doing to help learner-centered education, and where can it improve?</h2> <p><strong>YOUNG: </strong>Right now, technology is making the current system more efficient. So, most technology is designed to fit the way classrooms are designed, the way school is designed and the way districts are designed now. </p> <p>What is most needed for the <strong>learner-centered movement are technologies</strong> that are not designed assuming that a student is taking a class and that's how they're going to get the credit. </p> <p>Learning platforms are an example of something that we need to completely reimagine and invent to fit learner-centered environments. </p> <p>There needs to be a system <strong>designed with the assumption that students will be assessed in a lot of different ways</strong> and that evidence of learning is not always going to be a grade. </p> <p>There’s a huge empty space right now in the technology field for people who are actually inventing for the future, because most people are inventing for the present. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/10/data-driven-instruction-how-student-data-guides-formative-assessments-perfcon" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong>See how schools are using technology to improve student assessments.</em></a></p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>How much of this adjustment to learner-centered technology needs to be from new inventions, and how much can be adjustments to how teachers use current technology?</h2> <p><strong>YOUNG: </strong>I'm sure there is a lot of technology that has been invented that could fit, but the applications have yet to be developed.</p> <p>We have learner-centered environments that are inventing things themselves to keep track of the way kids are learning because nobody is providing the kinds of tools that are adaptable and flexible enough to service learner-centered environments. </p> <p>I think it is a problem of demand. <strong>Learner-centered is still a burgeoning sector</strong>. So, as an entrepreneur, if you are looking to build for where the most money is, you're going to build for the current system. </p> <p>You’re not going to build for the future, even though in our mind building for the future is where the investment is. </p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>Is there a way schools can transition away from the current system, while still meeting the test scores they need?</h2> <p><strong>YOUNG: </strong>There's a lot of room in the middle. But it is also urgent that educators change current conditions so that we can actually get to a new way of learning. I think something people do point out to us is that you can use technology for anything. </p> <p>If your goal is to improve test scores, you can use it for that. If your goal is to create curious children, you can use it for that. If you are trying to teach kids to research and tell fact from fiction, it can be used for that too. <strong>Technology is not the enemy</strong>. It is a tool to be used for whatever ends you're trying to accomplish.</p> <p><em><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/take-steps-make-modern-learning-spaces-reality" target="_blank"><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> Steps to creating a K–12 modern learning environment.</a></em></p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>There has been a lot of talk about “meaningful use” of technology today, how would you describe meaningful use?</h2> <p><strong>YOUNG: </strong>It is hard because there is no one-size-fits-all. Sometimes, a <strong>soft-paced, online math program can be exactly what a child wants and needs</strong>. Other times it can be totally boring, and it is just putting a curriculum online, which can make you lose the human element. </p> <p>Teachers should ask students whether a program is a meaningful use of technology or not. Teachers should trust their students about things like this because the kids know. </p> <p>In our experience, if you give them a say in what they want to learn, they will give you valuable feedback and tell you if something was a worthwhile tool or not.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/headshot.jpeg.jpg?itok=QfIQ8S6q" width="58" height="58" alt="Eli Zimmerman" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"> <div>Eli Zimmerman</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=eaztweets&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Eli has been eagerly pursuing a journalistic career since he left the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill School of Journalism. Previously, Eli was a staff reporter for medical trade publication <em>Frontline Medical News,</em> where he experienced the impact of continuous education and evolving teaching methods through the medical lens. When not in the office, Eli is busy scanning the web for the latest podcasts or stepping into the boxing ring for a few rounds.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 21 Jan 2019 18:49:45 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41846 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Providers Rise to Meet the Challenge of K–12 Data Security https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/providers-rise-meet-challenge-k-12-data-security <span>Providers Rise to Meet the Challenge of K–12 Data Security </span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Fri, 01/18/2019 - 13:45</span> <div><p>As data becomes integral to K–12 education, <a href="https://www.educationworld.com/a_news/why-collecting-student-data-important-student-achievement-1284123462" target="_blank">administrators face new challenges</a> to ensure they keep students’ information safe. </p> <p>Analysis of student data allows educators to identify at-risk students and implement further research into what does and does not work in the classroom. This data can also be used to <strong>create student profiles</strong>, which educators can use to enhance their personalized learning programs. </p> <p>“We’re creating individual learning profiles through which students will be able to see how they’re doing and performing against standards,” <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/data-interoperability-looms-large-districts-pursue-innovation-and-it-savings">said Cameron Berube</a>, executive director for teaching and learning for the <a href="https://www.providenceschools.org/" target="_blank">Providence (R.I.) Public School District</a>. “They and their teachers will have data that shows their strengths and their struggles and gives them more control of their own education.”</p> <p>Despite these benefits, many districts’ infrastructures <strong>do not meet the standards</strong> of the <a href="https://www.rand.org/pubs/perspectives/PE313.html" target="_blank">Federal Trade Commission’s Principles of Fair Information Practice</a>, which outline best practices to ensure student privacy and protection. The principles highlight five key points:</p> <ol><li> <p><strong>Notice and Awareness: </strong>Parents, students and other users must be notified that district systems are collecting their data. </p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Choice and Consent: </strong>Students and parents must be made aware of why data is being collected and have the right to opt out. </p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Access and Participation: </strong>Users have the right to access their data and, if necessary, edit the information.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Integrity and Security:</strong> All data must be properly secured through access controls, encryption and safe storage. </p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Enforcement and Redress: </strong>Compliance needs to be enforced so that the misuse of data has consequences.</p> </li> </ol><p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/11/k-12-it-leaders-can-mitigate-cybersecurity-risks-through-user-training" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> See how K–12 IT leaders can mitigate cybersecurity risk.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">3 Security Tools to Keep K–12 Student Data Safe</h2> <p>Ensuring top-quality data security has become a growing challenge over the years. In 2018, the education sector had <strong>101 reported data breaches and 292 additional incidents</strong>, according to <a href="https://enterprise.verizon.com/resources/reports/DBIR_2018_Report_execsummary.pdf" target="_blank">Verizon’s “2018 Data Breach Investigations Report.”</a></p> <p>While the FTC’s principles provide guidelines for keeping student data safe, they can also create obstacles for schools. Keeping parents informed and verifying ownership of all data collected by third-party vendors is not impossible, but it can be very complex. Currently, several companies lead the way with offerings that address the diverse infrastructure challenges of data collection through enhanced interoperability.</p> <ol><li> <p><strong>G Suite for Education:</strong> <a href="https://edu.google.com/training-support/privacy-security/?modal_active=none" target="_blank">Google </a>has confronted these issues head-on by signing on to the Future of Privacy Forum pledge, committing “to safeguard student personal information in services designed for use in schools.” Additionally, <a href="https://www.cdw.com/product/google-g-suite-basic/3378793" target="_blank">G Suite</a> offers a privacy notice to help parents understand how data is being used. <a href="https://usingtechnologybetter.com/google-in-education/" target="_blank">The platform is used by over 70 million teachers and students</a>. </p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Cisco and Pure Storage FlashStack:</strong> With the FlashStack converged infrastructure data center from <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/cisco.html?enkwrd=Cisco" target="_blank">Cisco</a> and <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/pure-storage.html" target="_blank">Pure Storage</a>, schools can utilize desktop virtualization to increase their data protection. In addition, the system offers compatibility with secure cloud platforms, including those from Cisco, <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=VMware&amp;ctlgfilter=&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">VMware</a> and <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=OpenStack&amp;ctlgfilter=&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">OpenStack</a>. <a href="https://www.purestorage.com/content/dam/purestorage/pdf/Case Studies/Colorado_Department_of_Education_Pure_Customer_Case_Study.pdf" target="_blank">The Colorado Department of Education</a>, responsible for more than 900,000 students, saw faster service without performance concerns, reduced data center occupancy and stronger storage capabilities after implementing FlashStack. Steve Berryman, infrastructure manager for CDE, noted the impressive effectiveness of the system, which he says demonstrated top performance and reliability.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Symantec Endpoint Protection Cloud:</strong> The <a href="https://www.symantec.com/content/dam/symantec/docs/data-sheets/endpoint-protection-academic-edition-data-sheet-en.pdf" target="_blank">Symantec Endpoint Protection Academic edition package</a> includes SEP 14, an enterprise-grade threat protection program that can keep faculty and students safe, no matter what device they are using. On top of core offerings, such as firewall protection and application control, the package lets students safely enroll their personal devices without an IT administrator.</p> </li> </ol><p> <a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" data-widget="image" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/cyber-security-report.html" id="" rel="" target="_blank" title=""><img alt="Cybersecurity_IR_howstrong_700x220.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://fedtechmagazine.com/sites/fedtechmagazine.com/files/Cybersecurity_IR_howstrong_700x220.jpg" /></a></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/taxonomy/term/11721"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/Katelyn%20Sweeney.jpeg.jpg?itok=dwNRrhmu" width="58" height="58" alt="Katelyn Sweeney" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/taxonomy/term/11721"> <div>Katelyn Sweeney</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Katelyn has a degree in Childhood and Adolescent Education. Over the past four years, she has taught English and quickly became a huge advocate for digital literacy and integrative technology in the classroom.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 18 Jan 2019 18:45:06 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41841 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Winter 2019 https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/magazine/issue/2019/1/winter-2019 <span>Winter 2019</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Thu, 01/17/2019 - 14:17</span> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-vertical" data-layout="vertical" data-url="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/magazine/issue/2019/1/winter-2019" data-title="Winter 2019" data-via="EdTech_K12" data-button-background="none"> <span> <span>Jan</span> <span>17</span> <span>2019</span> </span> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-pinterest cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-counter="true" data-url="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/magazine/issue/2019/1/winter-2019" data-title="Winter 2019" data-via="EdTech_K12" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a href="https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=https%3A%2F%2Fedtechmagazine.com%2Fk12%2Frss.xml%3Fitok%3DmlohmR6s%26destination%3D%2Fk12%2F%253Fitok%253DmlohmR6s%26_exception_statuscode%3D404" target="_blank"><span class="pw-box-counter cdw-taboola" data-channel="twitter"></span></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-pinterest cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-url="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/magazine/issue/2019/1/winter-2019" data-title="Winter 2019" data-via="EdTech_K12" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="twitter"></span> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="facebook"></span> </div> </div> Thu, 17 Jan 2019 19:17:59 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41831 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Technology Makes or Breaks Esports Programs https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/technology-makes-or-breaks-esports-programs <span>Technology Makes or Breaks Esports Programs</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/amyburroughs26341" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">amy.burroughs_26341</span></span> <span>Thu, 01/17/2019 - 13:47</span> <div><p>A growing number of schools are launching esports teams or programs to <strong>give student gamers a competitive outlet</strong> for their video game habits.</p> <p>Esports leagues help turn a typically solo activity into a team experience that <strong>fosters collaboration and builds community</strong>.</p> <p>The High School Esports League <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/esports-programs-start-pop-k-12-schools">reports</a> it now represents about <strong>1,200 schools</strong> — <strong>up from 200</strong> the year before. And the National Association of Collegiate Esports includes <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/08/video-games-score-points-teachers-academic-benefits">110 colleges and member institutions</a>.</p> <p><em><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/08/video-games-score-points-teachers-academic-benefits" target="_blank"><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> See why educators embrace the benefits of esports.</a></em></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Esports Equipment Can Support Other School Initiatives</h2> <p>In competitive gaming, <strong>milliseconds matter</strong>, and the technology supporting students can make or break an esports <a href="https://venturebeat.com/2018/09/04/for-college-esports-competition-is-only-as-good-as-the-tech-behind-it/" target="_blank">venture</a>.</p> <p>Schools looking to start their own programs may need to invest in gaming hardware and <strong>update network infrastructure to ensure adequate bandwidth</strong> and avoid lagging speeds and interruptions. </p> <p>However, schools often can <strong>support esports programs with their existing IT</strong>, and can purchase esports <strong>equipment that will also support other uses</strong> in the school, such as a lab or virtual reality setup. My team has helped dozens of K–12 and higher education institutions set up similar projects and esports arenas.</p> <p>My advice, always, to schools starting out is to ensure that all equipment and networking technology can support the speeds and processing the sport requires. That equipment typically can be used and enjoyed by other teams or by the school at large, so it’s important that you get <strong>the most return from every dollar spent</strong>.</p> <p>For example, schools looking to bring VR equipment into the classroom often try to ensure the machines will also support an esports program. I’ve found that schools and districts take a number of approaches to getting started, depending on what’s available and how they plan to compete.</p> <p><em><a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/articles/digitalworkspace/2018/01/23/best-practices-for-creating-modern-learning-environments.html" target="_blank"><strong>DOWNLOAD:</strong> Get CDW’s white paper “A Modern Learning Environment.”</a></em></p> <h2 id="toc_1">Districts Find Creative Approaches to Launch Esports</h2> <p><a href="https://www.svusd.org/" target="_blank">Saddleback Valley Unified School District</a> in California recently launched its own program after purchasing extra computer memory and upgraded video cards for its desktop computers. The district also <strong>adjusted its firewall to enable the games</strong> — “Overwatch” and “League of Legends” — to get past the district’s content filter.</p> <p>“We did a lot of preplanning,” says Ozzy Cortez, CTO for the district. “It was a group effort to say, here’s this awesome opportunity, here are teachers who are willing to jump into this. And the <strong>student response was overwhelming</strong>. It was very exciting.” </p> <p>Similarly, when it launched its own esports program four years ago, <a href="https://www.sd308.org/oehs" target="_blank">Oswego East High School</a> in Illinois adjusted its firewall to whitelist video games to play on district computers after school hours. The student gamers compete using <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=dell%20optiplex%20720&amp;ctlgfilter=&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">Dell OptiPlex 7020</a> desktop computers that are connected to the Ethernet.</p> <p>Students who compete on the <a href="https://www.fresnounified.org" target="_blank">Fresno Unified School District’s</a> esports team use <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=msi%20trident%203&amp;ctlgfilter=&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">MSI Trident 3</a> devices, supplemented by <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/computers/?key=hp+elitebook+850&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1&amp;w=c" target="_blank">HP EliteBook 850</a> notebooks connected via Cisco 802.11ac wireless access points — all of which the district purchased before launching the program. The district also bought about <strong>150 game licenses</strong>, which cost about $20 each.</p> <p>Other districts have found <strong>creative ways to launch esports</strong> at their schools. At a high school in Ohio, students who <a href="https://www.cleveland.com/brooklyn/2019/01/brooklyn_high_school_enters_ga.html" target="_blank">participate</a> in its gaming tournament are provided space and a screen, but use their own game systems and “Madden NFL 19” to play. The school is planning similar tournaments for “NBA 2K” and “Super Smash Bros.” And a school district in Texas has partnered with <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/microsoft-interstitial.html?enkwrd=icrosoft&amp;encrtd=microsoft" target="_blank">Microsoft</a> and the University of Texas at Arlington’s esports program to launch its <a href="https://www.burlesonstar.net/news-local-news-texas-news/burleson-isd-heading-esports-arena" target="_blank">first</a> esports tournament, which is scheduled for February.</p> <p><em>This article is part of the "Connect IT: Bridging the Gap Between Education and Technology" series. Please join the discussion on Twitter by using the <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23ConnectIT&amp;src=typd" target="_blank">#ConnectIT</a> hashtag.</em></p> <p> </p> <p></p><center><a href="http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/node/11661" target="_blank" title="Connect IT"><img alt="[title]Connect IT: Bridging the Gap Between Education and Technology" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="87" src="http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/sites/default/files/articles/2014/05/connectit.jpg" title="[title]Connect IT: Bridging the Gap Between Education and Technology" width="400" /></a></center> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/author/joe-mcallister"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/JoeMcAllister.jpg?itok=wnB4yNmz" width="58" height="58" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/author/joe-mcallister"> <div>Joe McAllister</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Joe McAllister is a learning environment advisor at CDW•G.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 17 Jan 2019 18:47:27 +0000 amy.burroughs_26341 41826 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 E-Rate Funding Will Continue During Government Shutdown https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/e-rate-funding-will-continue-during-government-shutdown <span>E-Rate Funding Will Continue During Government Shutdown</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Wed, 01/16/2019 - 17:19</span> <div><p>The E-rate program will <strong>continue to run as scheduled </strong>regardless of whether parts or all of the Federal Communications Commission are shut down,<a href="https://www.fundsforlearning.com/news/2019/01/e-rate-funding-continues-despite-shutdown" target="_blank"> Funds For Learning reports</a>. </p> <p>On January 3rd, the<strong> FCC suspended operations as part of a partial government shutdown</strong>, however officials say schools applying for E-rate funds should continue to follow the application process. According to Funds For Learning, this means:</p> <blockquote><ul><li>The competitive bidding requirements remain active and applicants can post new Form 470 requests for proposals.</li> <li>The funding year 2019 filing window is still scheduled to open January 16, 2019.</li> <li>The deadline for many funding year 2017 non-recurring service invoices is still January 28, 2019. </li> </ul></blockquote> <p>“As always, it’s important that <strong>E-rate applicants stay in-the-know on updates to the application process</strong>, and to the program,” says John Harrington, CEO of Funds For Learning. “A common question I’ve heard this year is if the process will be impacted by the government shutdown, and the answer is no – it’s business as usual for E-rate filing.”</p> <p>To learn more about navigating the E-rate application process, visit <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/inside-look-e-rate"><em>Edtech</em>’s E-rate landing page</a>.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/headshot.jpeg.jpg?itok=QfIQ8S6q" width="58" height="58" alt="Eli Zimmerman" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"> <div>Eli Zimmerman</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=eaztweets&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Eli has been eagerly pursuing a journalistic career since he left the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill School of Journalism. Previously, Eli was a staff reporter for medical trade publication <em>Frontline Medical News,</em> where he experienced the impact of continuous education and evolving teaching methods through the medical lens. When not in the office, Eli is busy scanning the web for the latest podcasts or stepping into the boxing ring for a few rounds.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 16 Jan 2019 22:19:12 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41821 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Q&A: Adam Welcome on How K–12 Educators Can Integrate Technology for Engagement https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/qa-adam-welcome-how-k-12-educators-can-integrate-technology-engagement <span>Q&amp;A: Adam Welcome on How K–12 Educators Can Integrate Technology for Engagement</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Wed, 01/16/2019 - 13:21</span> <div><p>In order to use technology properly in the classroom, <strong>teachers need to take a back seat</strong> and allow students to spend more time as the drivers of their own education, says educational consultant and public speaker Adam Welcome. </p> <p>One of the main draws of technology integration is <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/02/what-modern-learning-environment">finding new ways to engage students</a>. However, many educators struggle with finding creative ways to introduce new classroom tools. </p> <p>For example, if teachers bring in one-to-one <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/Computers/Notebook-Computers/?w=C3&amp;ln=0&amp;a3407=50713045&amp;enkwrd=Chromebooks" target="_blank">Chromebooks</a>, but use them only for typing class, the technology could quickly become stale, Welcome explains. </p> <p>We spoke to Welcome about why he thinks students <strong>need to have more freedom to explore the technology</strong> available to them in their classroom, and how teachers can use technology to build relationships with their students. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/03/how-orchestrate-digital-transformation" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong> See how to orchestrate a digital transformation in your school.</em></a></p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>As an education technology consultant and speaker, what is your main message?</h2> <p><strong>WELCOME: </strong>I talk a lot about how to simplify educators’ entry into technology integration. You do not need to get a master's degree or spend $10,000 on an online course. You just need to be <strong>brave enough to have the tools in your classroom</strong> and to give up some of your control to the students. </p> <div style="padding: 5px; width: 299px; color: rgb(236, 236, 236); margin-bottom: 10px; margin-left: 15px; float: right; background-color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/Adam%20Welcome.png" style="width: 299px; height: 382px;" title="“Dan" /><br /><span style="color: #939393; font-size: 10px;">Photo: Courtesy of Premiere Speaker's Bureau</span> <div style="font-size: 18px;">Adam Welcome, speaker and author of <em>Kids Deserve It!</em> &amp; <em>Run Like A Pirate.</em></div> </div> <p>I also, very pointedly and very respectfully, tell people just to get over themselves. Teachers <strong>need to accept what they do not know</strong> and what they have not been trained on and what they may not be used to because I really believe teachers are more important than ever, they are just important in different ways. </p> <p>Teachers need to think about, and conduct, their classroom in different ways than they did even five years ago. When I left the classroom 10 years ago, the big thing was having iPods in my classroom. </p> <p>Now we have <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/Monitors-Projectors/Interactive-Whiteboards-Accessories/Interactive-Whiteboards/?w=D02&amp;enkwrd=smartboards&amp;encrtd=smartboard" target="_blank">smartboards</a> and Chromebooks, and things are evolving so rapidly that teachers have to get over what they do not understand and go along for the ride with the students.</p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>What do you see as the greatest issue for K–12 classrooms when it comes to technology integration?</h2> <p><strong>WELCOME: </strong>I think so many educators are still just giving kids the latest technology as a <strong>substitute for what we used to do</strong>, essentially taking what we did on paper and pencil and now making it electronic. </p> <p>The issue with that is we are not really transforming the learning with the technology that we have, and I see it a lot. Often, teachers think that they are pigeonholed by only doing technology during “technology time,” as though we are <strong>still using the old computer lab model</strong> where kids would go down the hall twice a week for 45 minutes to use technology. </p> <p>It is incredible, because lot of schools have invested a lot of money in Chromebooks and they are limited their uses to strictly <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/google-interstitial.html?enkwrd=Google">Google</a> Classroom or when they're typing. </p> <p>Those applications are fine, but I talk a lot about h<strong>ow to integrate technology in cool ways for engagement purposes</strong>, like during social studies or math lessons or science. So much of it is not even reliant on the teacher, which can take the pressure off for teachers who feel like they need to be the expert. </p> <p>And they shouldn't even try to be the expert. They should just know enough to introduce the concept to the students.</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/09/k-12-schools-work-incorporate-computer-science-curriculums" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong>Innovative K–12 teachers incorporate computer science into everyday activities.</em></a></p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>Why is it that the use of educational technology has remained pretty linear for some K–12 schools, despite the technology itself advancing rapidly?</h2> <p><strong>WELCOME: </strong>Well, I think a lot of school districts have invested <strong>a lot of money in professional development and tech coaches</strong>, which I don't think is the best use of their time or money. </p> <p>Teachers are definitely trying, but they are just trying to do what they have always done with new technology. It is great that teachers can edit in real time and kids can work at home and there are no more flash drives and other extraneous tech, but there are so many other ways to teach too.</p> <p>I think a big problem is a lot of people in education <strong>do not really know what is happening outside in the world</strong>. </p> <p>Take <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/11/3d-printing-highly-effective-building-creative-skills-k-12-infographic">3D printing</a>, for instance. Say you're reading Charlotte's Web in class and you want to do a project to go with it. Do not have the kids build a clay model of the pig, have them design it in <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/autodesk.html?enkwrd=CAD" target="_blank">TinkerCAD</a> and then print it on a 3D printer. The amount of engagement you are going to have because you are<strong> incorporating technology into a language arts lesson</strong> is going to go way up. </p> <p>As another example,<a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/esports-programs-start-pop-k-12-schools"> take a look at esports</a>. The industry for competitive gaming is absolutely bonkers. One of the most popular games right now, “Fortnight,” makes a million and a half dollars a day on their iOS app. So, when I look at that, I think every elementary, middle and high school should have an esports team. </p> <p><strong>Seventy-five percent of teenagers play video games</strong>, which tells me that esports is already there. Schools should be meeting kids where they are, and then try to understand how can to integrate some curriculum around those interests.</p> <p>When it comes down to it, we no longer live in a time where the teacher knows all of the information and regurgitates to the student. Teachers should be facilitating the learning process for kids, allowing kids to go on their educational journey.</p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">EDTECH: </strong>How would educators negotiate giving students so much freedom with standardized testing and other current assessments?</h2> <p><strong>WELCOME: </strong>I had a high school teacher ask me a similar question recently, about a final exam they had to prepare the kids for, and the answer I gave was that the style of teaching I have outlined is ideal, <strong>but you cannot do it all the time</strong>. </p> <p>If there are certain things that you have to prepare for because it is not digitized, then you do that when you need to. But <strong>no one is studying for one test every period of every day</strong>. I would also push back and say the new way of teaching could be more beneficial for those types of tests. </p> <p>Let us say the kids are learning about the Silk Road. Typically, they read about the Silk Road in a textbook, take a quiz in September, and then are tested on that material in May.</p> <p>Now, let’s say, for one class, maybe they <strong>build a map of the Silk Road instead</strong>, and they get a <span class="MsoHyperlink"><span style="font-size:12.0pt;&lt;br /&gt;&#10;font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif;mso-fareast-font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;;&lt;br /&gt;&#10;mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA"><a href="https://www.cdw.com/product/teq-sphero-bolt-education-robots-with-8x8-led-matrix-15-pack/5322861" target="_blank">Sphero robot</a></span></span> and they code the Silk Road with that robot over a two-week period. Fast forward to May: Who is going to remember more about the Silk Road? The kids who just read about it in a textbook or the kids who had an experience with highly engaging materials?</p> <p>I think the second group of students are going to <strong>retain more information for that assessment</strong> because they had that experience with technology, because that's the language that our kids speak. Students do not speak in “worksheet.” Students do not love just reading a textbook. </p> <p>That is not the world that they live in. <strong>Kids that are active participants with technology</strong> in their learning are going to retain more because they are going to have more fun. There's going to be fewer disciplinary actions in your classroom because the best discipline program is an engaged classroom.</p> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/digital-transformation-trends.html"><img alt="Digital%20Transformation_IR_1.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/healthtechmagazine.net/files/Digital%20Transformation_IR_1.jpg" /></a></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/headshot.jpeg.jpg?itok=QfIQ8S6q" width="58" height="58" alt="Eli Zimmerman" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"> <div>Eli Zimmerman</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=eaztweets&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Eli has been eagerly pursuing a journalistic career since he left the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill School of Journalism. Previously, Eli was a staff reporter for medical trade publication <em>Frontline Medical News,</em> where he experienced the impact of continuous education and evolving teaching methods through the medical lens. When not in the office, Eli is busy scanning the web for the latest podcasts or stepping into the boxing ring for a few rounds.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 16 Jan 2019 18:21:16 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41816 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Customize Your Experience with the EdTech Insider Program https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/customize-your-experience-edtech-insider-program <span>Customize Your Experience with the EdTech Insider Program</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Tue, 01/15/2019 - 11:52</span> <div><p>As an educator, you’re swamped when it comes to keeping up with the latest and greatest in ed tech.</p> <p>You count on us to advise you on <strong>IT management and ­general tech know-how</strong>. But there’s so much to sift through across social media, online searches and hallway ­conversations. That’s why we’ve taken the time to reimagine our Insider ­program in a way that’s smarter, more user-friendly and, ultimately, more valuable. </p> <p>EdTech Insiders gain access to <strong>personalized content recommendations</strong> and our most in-depth, premium articles, videos and more. Insiders can unlock access to white papers, view daily fast facts, save articles to read later and weigh in on trending topics through Insider polls.</p> <h2>Your Insider Experience Grows With You</h2> <p>What I find most exciting about the new Insider content dashboard is that <strong>the more you use it, the smarter it gets</strong>. Insiders select the topics and subjects they want to learn more about or that affect their day-to-day, and receive personalized Insider updates based on those preferences. That means you can easily read what’s important to you first, when you want it, without losing time on a search or perusing nonessentials. </p> <p>When content catches your eye but you don’t have time to read, tap or click a flag found on every article and video to save it in your library and quickly access it later.</p> <p>Beyond the cool factor of having articles served up based on your ­personalized interests and reading habits, EdTech Insider also offers users access to a <strong>growing library of exclusive content</strong> not available to the general website or print magazine audiences. You won’t want to miss out on what’s in store.</p> <p>Visit <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/cdw_insider_registration/register-web">edtechmag.com/k12/register</a> to become an Insider today. There, you can also renew or sign up to receive a print subscription, as well as our e-newsletter, which brings must-read content to your inbox twice a month. Thank you for making EdTech a part of your workday. As always, we’re here to help.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/author/ryan-petersen"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/ryan-petersen-2013-headshot.jpg?itok=iV6msfy0" width="58" height="58" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/author/ryan-petersen"> <div>Ryan Petersen</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="google-plus" href="https://plus.google.com/110888965639568833839/posts?rel=author"><span>Google+</span></a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=RyanPete&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Ryan has been a magazine and newspaper editor for 18 years, with the last 12 covering a variety of bases for CDW’s family of tech magazines. As Editor in Chief, he works on developing editorial strategy and is always on the lookout for new writing talent and sharing great stories with the IT world. In his spare time, Ryan enjoys spending time with his family, biking and obsessively following Iowa Hawkeye sports and Cubs baseball.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 15 Jan 2019 16:52:22 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41811 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 4 Surprising Benefits of Gaming for K–12 Students https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/4-surprising-benefits-gaming-k-12-students <span>4 Surprising Benefits of Gaming for K–12 Students</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Mon, 01/14/2019 - 15:23</span> <div><p>Historically, many adults have derided video games as a waste of time at best, and actively destructive at worst. But research shows there may be benefits to conquering virtual bad guys and dunking on on-screen friends.</p> <p>When <a href="https://www.svusd.org/" target="_blank">Saddleback Valley Unified School District</a> in California introduced esports to their program, administrators saw an <strong>increase in teamwork and engagement from participating students</strong>. </p> <p>It’s all about creativity and collaboration,” says Ron Pirayoff, director of secondary education for Saddleback Valley USD. “Those are tenets that we’re trying to support every day in all of our subject areas. I look at esports as a vehicle for engaging kids. It’s really been a way for us to reach a different population.”</p> <p>Esports also encourages <strong>more social engagement from students</strong> who might have trouble fitting in. </p> <p>“I can’t tell you how many teachers and parents have written in about students completely turning around, coming out of their shell, smiling and having a good time,” says Mason Mullenioux, CEO of the High School Esports League.</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/12/k-12-schools-see-emergence-esports-clubs-infographic" target="_blank"><img alt="esports infographic" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/EdK-12-eSports-Infographic_VisualCTA.jpg" /></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">4 Ways Esports Improves K–12 Skills</h2> <ol><li> <p><strong>BETTER SPATIAL ATTENTION:</strong> One study found that playing action video games improves the ability to locate a target stimulus among distractions — a test that predicts driving ability. A meta-analysis of 111 video game–related studies recently published in the <a href="https://learningtransferlab.wiscweb.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/280/2017/11/Bediou_et_al_PsychBull_2017.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Psychological Bulletin</em></a> found <strong>10 to 30 hours of gameplay </strong>can help students improve their spatial cognition and multitasking. The report’s primary author, Benoit Bediou, points out that different games come with different benefits. While a puzzle game might help more with spatial awareness, a fast-paced action game could be more beneficial for quick decision-making.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>ENHANCED PROBLEM-SOLVING: </strong>When adolescents reported playing strategic video games in one long-term study, they tended to improve both their problem-solving abilities and their school grades the following year. Game developer and researcher <a href="https://it.arizona.edu/blog/game-changer-video-games-and-real-world-problem-solving-part-one" target="_blank">Jane McGonigal says</a> that because gamers spend a majority of their time failing (about <strong>80 percent</strong>, she says), they are encouraged to develop alternative thinking strategies, which are applicable to real-world situations.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>PRACTICE, PATIENCE </strong><strong>AND</strong><strong> PERSEVERANCE: </strong>The <a href="https://www.amle.org/BrowsebyTopic/WhatsNew/WNDet/TabId/270/ArtMID/888/ArticleID/854/The-Hidden-Benefits-of-Video-Games.aspx" target="_blank">Association for </a><a href="https://www.amle.org/BrowsebyTopic/WhatsNew/WNDet/TabId/270/ArtMID/888/ArticleID/854/The-Hidden-Benefits-of-Video-Games.aspx" target="_blank">Middle Level</a><a href="https://www.amle.org/BrowsebyTopic/WhatsNew/WNDet/TabId/270/ArtMID/888/ArticleID/854/The-Hidden-Benefits-of-Video-Games.aspx" target="_blank"> Education</a> points out that video games often require kids to perfect their strategies and methods of attack through repetitious trial and error. “Delays of gratification have been correlated to better study behaviors and decreased drug usage,” the association notes.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>INCREASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: </strong>A <a href="https://www.drcherylolson.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/14_SPORTS-VIDEOGAMES-AND-REAL-WORLD-EXERCISE.pdf" target="_blank">Harvard study showed</a> — somewhat counterintuitively — that kids who played sports video games were frequently motivated to take up athletics in real life. And some games, such as Pokémon GO, require participants to move around in the real world.</p> </li> </ol><p>For more on esports in K–12, read "<em>E<a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/esports-programs-start-pop-k-12-schools" target="_blank">sports Programs Start to Pop Up in K–12 Schools</a>."</em></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/author/calvin-hennick"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/calvin-hennick.jpeg.jpg?itok=xXXtEq5w" width="58" height="58" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/author/calvin-hennick"> <div>Calvin Hennick</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=calvinhennick&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Calvin Hennick is a freelance journalist who specializes in business and technology writing. He is a contributor to the CDW family of technology magazines.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 14 Jan 2019 20:23:35 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41806 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 Esports Programs Start to Pop Up in K–12 Schools https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/esports-programs-start-pop-k-12-schools <span>Esports Programs Start to Pop Up in K–12 Schools</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Fri, 01/11/2019 - 11:44</span> <div><p>Athletes at <a href="https://www.svusd.org/schools/high-schools/mission-viejo" target="_blank">Mission Viejo High School</a> in California huddle after their matches, pushing each other to improve. “The kids will say, ‘We need to communicate better, let’s meet to talk about our ­strategy,’” says Tiffany Bui, the team’s faculty adviser. “They’ll talk about what went well, what didn’t go well. It’s interesting to see the players guide each other. You see leaders emerge.”</p> <p>Roughly 100 miles north, at <a href="https://www.fresnounified.org/schools/duncan" target="_blank">Duncan Polytechnical High School</a> in Fresno, officials hope that student-athletes are <strong>building skills that transcend sports</strong>. “What we really want is for the students to come out of the sport knowing how to collaborate, how to communicate, how to value and respect their team members,” says Fresno Unified School District CTO Kurt Madden. </p> <p>These athletes chase glory, not on the track or football field, but <strong>on video game screens</strong>. Responding to the <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/10/qa-laz-alberto-describes-rise-high-school-esports" target="_blank">rise in competitive gaming</a> — professional esports tournaments garner millions of online viewers, and some colleges and universities now offer scholarships for top players — school-sanctioned leagues have arrived at the high school level. </p> <p>In just the past year, the number of schools represented by the High School Esports League (HSEL) has grown from around<strong> 200 to more than 1,200</strong>. </p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/08/video-games-score-points-teachers-academic-benefits" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH: </strong>K–12 schools uncover academic benefits associated with esports programs.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Esports Offers Tangible Benefits Beyond the Field</h2> <p>Proponents say that high school esports programs transform what is <strong>often an isolating activity into a social experience</strong>, leading to many of the same rewards as traditional athletics. By creating an esports program, Mission Viejo and Duncan high schools hoped to give their student gamers a chance not only to hone their craft but also to learn how to be team players. </p> <p>“There’s historically been a stigma associated with gaming,” says Steve Jaworski, head of strategic partnerships for HSEL. “Teenage gamers have been stereotyped as ‘basement dwellers,’ especially when others in their school communities frown on gaming as a waste of time. Now, instead of feeling alone, they’re welcomed into the ­community. They’re <strong>contributing to the school ecosystem</strong>, and they’re passionate about being rewarded. These previously disenfranchised young people are being accepted — and, in many cases, celebrated.”</p> <h2 id="toc_1">How K–12 Schools Get Their Esports Programs Started</h2> <p>Often, schools can <strong>leverage their existing IT investments</strong> to support esports programs. At <a href="https://www.svusd.org/" target="_blank">Saddleback Valley Unified School District</a> (home of Mission Viejo High), getting a program off the ground mostly involved purchasing some extra memory and better video cards for existing desktops, as well as making firewall adjustments to allow video games through the district’s content filter. Students in the district compete in the games “Overwatch” and “League of Legends.” </p> <p>“We did a lot of preplanning,” says Ozzy Cortez, CTO for the district. “It was a group effort to say, here’s this awesome opportunity, here are teachers who are willing to jump into this. And the student response was overwhelming. It was very exciting.” </p> <p>Fresno USD created its own esports tournament, with the <strong>district’s 12 high schools squaring off in “Rocket League,” </strong>a game that has been described as “soccer, but with rocket-powered cars.” To prepare, students practice with their teams after school and compete against other schools in scrimmages. </p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/author/calvin-hennick"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/calvin-hennick.jpeg.jpg?itok=xXXtEq5w" width="58" height="58" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/author/calvin-hennick"> <div>Calvin Hennick</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=calvinhennick&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Calvin Hennick is a freelance journalist who specializes in business and technology writing. He is a contributor to the CDW family of technology magazines.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 11 Jan 2019 16:44:48 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41801 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12 State of K–12 IT Survey Highlights Cloud Technology and Security [#Infographic] https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/state-k-12-it-survey-highlights-cloud-technology-and-security-infographic <span>State of K–12 IT Survey Highlights Cloud Technology and Security [#Infographic]</span> <span><span lang="" about="/k12/dashboard/elizimmerman9856" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">eli.zimmerman_9856</span></span> <span>Thu, 01/10/2019 - 13:39</span> <div><p>Cloud migration and cybersecurity solutions are two important areas for K–12 schools looking to upgrade their IT infrastructure, according to a survey conducted by nonprofit organization <a href="https://tomorrow.org/" target="_blank">Project Tomorrow</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://blog.identityautomation.com/cloud-computing-for-schools-how-iam-systems-can-improve-migration" target="_blank">Eighty percent of K–12 districts</a> are using <strong>cloud-based software to improve everything</strong> from classroom collaboration and administrative tasks to <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/05/3-tips-switching-cloud-voip">phone systems</a>. </p> <p>With the incorporation of cloud-based tools, K–12 schools are starting to consider <strong>more effective privacy and security measures</strong>, such as identity access management and managed cloud services from third-party vendors that can take responsibility for overseeing security.</p> <p>“On the IT side of things, there are tools emerging from standard vendors, including cloud access security brokers, that are designed to help <strong>look for and set alerts for data going onto the cloud</strong>,” <a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/06/how-protect-sensitive-data-saas-applications" target="_blank">says Robert Ayoub</a>, program director for security products at IDC. “These tools are really great, and I know a lot of school districts tend to be behind the curve when it comes to IT and security.”</p> <p>For a clearer picture of where the technological needs and trends are when it comes to K–12 cloud migration and security, Project Tomorrow created an infographic with data from its most recent survey.</p> <p><a href="https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/01/3-cybersecurity-threats-k-12-schools-should-prepare-2019" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM EDTECH:</strong> 3 cybersecurity threats to watch for in 2019.</em></a></p> <p><img alt="infographic" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/iboss-5c-20fina_29771997_gg.jpg" /></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"><img src="/k12/sites/edtechmagazine.com.k12/files/styles/face_small/public/people/headshot.jpeg.jpg?itok=QfIQ8S6q" width="58" height="58" alt="Eli Zimmerman" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/k12/author/eli-zimmerman"> <div>Eli Zimmerman</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=eaztweets&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Eli has been eagerly pursuing a journalistic career since he left the University of Maryland's Philip Merrill School of Journalism. Previously, Eli was a staff reporter for medical trade publication <em>Frontline Medical News,</em> where he experienced the impact of continuous education and evolving teaching methods through the medical lens. When not in the office, Eli is busy scanning the web for the latest podcasts or stepping into the boxing ring for a few rounds.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 10 Jan 2019 18:39:37 +0000 eli.zimmerman_9856 41796 at https://edtechmagazine.com/k12